COLLABORATION VITAL IN MEETING GOVT TARGETS, SAYS KULI

by PNG Business News - November 11, 2022

Photo: Coffee Minister, Hon Joe Kuli

Newly appointed coffee minister and Member for Anglimp-South Waghi, Hon. Joe Kuli is adamant in seeing that the government’s targets set for increasing coffee production and exports is progressed under his leadership. Minister Kuli said this during a recent meeting with the Coffee Industry Corporation Limited (CICL) management in Port Moresby. 

Kuli acknowledged the Marape-Rosso Government for the initiative in creating three new ministries under the Department of Agriculture and Livestock in which, coffee is one of them.

“I thank the government of the day to realise the potential of coffee industry and for giving this ministry that we now have a representative in the government for coffee matters", he said.

The coffee minister highlighted that coffee was very important to people in the rural areas. “I see that agriculture is something that our people continue to survive on for their daily needs. Cash flow and daily needs are met through the sweat and hard work our people put into working on the land.” Said Minister Kuli.

The minister said apart from other ongoing coffee programs, coffee road project is a priority that must be continued to have easier access for farmers to markets.

Minister Kuli said he would like to also see that more extension officers are placed in the districts and local level governments to restore the confidence and enthusiasm the farmers once had in the industry.  

He thanked the CICL management team for presenting important information on the status of the coffee industry and ongoing projects for his noting and how best the new ministry under his leadership could be able to support and progress work further.  

He further stated that “We must work hard to ensure coffee exports exceed the K1b benchmark. Another important factor is to put more extension officers in the field to move what we are currently doing. The Prime Minister has given me this portfolio with no structure but has put it under coffee and CICL you are already there. CICL is well established, and you are already carrying out the various programs. My team and I will join hands with you to see what better policies and programs we can enhance and work together to meet the targets as set out by the government.” 

CICL Chief Operations Officer, Steven Tumae on behalf of the Board and the management congratulated Kuli on his appointment and said that CICL stood ready to work closely with him and his team.

“We are grateful that you have been re-elected to represent the Anglimp-South Waghi people and to be given the role of heading the coffee ministry."

Tumae told the Minister of CICL’s existing programs and aspirations the industry had in achieving the government’s target of three million coffee bags by 2030. 

He said apart from relooking at the coffee replanting program, coffee rehabilitation, freight subsidy, road access and marketing, increasing the number of extension officers in the districts was one area that needed support to boost extension services for farmers.

“Going forward, more partnerships with the district and provincial governments is needed to reach out and assist farmers in the rural areas.



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