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June 10, 2024
As Papua New Guinea takes its course towards a sustainable, climate-resilient future, the Climate FIRST Project stands as a point, to the power of partnership, innovation, and collective action in tackling the defining challenge of our time. Climate resilience and sustainable development was marked by the Climate FIRST Inception Workshop and the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signing, uniting the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), Climate Change and Development Authority (CCDA), and seven provinces in PNG. The inception workshop, held from June 3rd to 4th at the Hilton Hotel, Port Moresby, served as a pivotal platform for strategic discussions and collaborative agreements aimed at supporting climate finance and resilience across the nation. The project is implemented in partnership between the CCDA, GGGI, the Australian High Commission (AHC) on behalf of the department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australia, and Provincial Administration of seven provinces which are Eastern Highlands, Enga, Manus, Milne Bay, Morobe, New Ireland and Simbu. The partnership and participation between organisers and stakeholders emphasized the urgency of addressing climate change's adverse impacts on PNG's rich and natural ecosystems. The two-day event commenced with deliberative sessions aimed at making clear the project's objectives, expected outcomes, and associated risks. It was also the first opportunity to bring all stakeholders together to discuss implementation arrangements at the national and provincial level. Key sessions on the first day encompassed comprehensive discussions on Climate FIRST's overarching goals, governance structure, stakeholder roles, and progress updates on green investment pipelines. The engagements fostered a deeper understanding among stakeholders, laying the groundwork for effective collaboration and decision-making. The second day featured a formal inception meeting, highlighted by a momentous signing ceremony of MOUs between CCDA, GGGI, and the seven participating provinces. Attendees included Nic Johnson, Counsellor (Enonomics), Australian High Commission and Motsy David, First Secretary, on behalf of Hon. Simo Kilepa, Minister for Environment, Conservation and Climate Change, underscoring the significance of collective action in addressing climate challenges.  Crucial sessions on the second day included discussions on governance structures, provincial capacities, and future action plans, reinforcing the commitment of all parties to uphold transparency, accountability, and sustainable development principles. The event drew over 50 participants from diplomatic corps, donor partners, government representatives, civil society organizations, and academia, signaling broad-based support for Climate FIRST's ambitious objectives. During the Inception Workshop First Secretary Motsy David gave the keynote speech on behalf of Hon. Simo Kilepa MP, Minister for Environment, Conservation and Climate Change delivered the keynote speech, advocating for transformative climate action. First Secretary Motsy David underscored the transformative potential of the Climate FIRST initiative, emphasizing its pivotal role in reshaping PNG's approach to development and resource management. David's remarks resonated with a diverse audience of stakeholders, highlighting the project's ambitious objectives and the collective commitment required to address climate change challenges. “Climate change is no longer a distant threat but a present reality that affects every facet of our lives. Our Communities, rich in culture and tradition, our pristine natural landscapes, and our diverse ecosystems are increasingly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of changing climate patterns. Rising sea levels, extreme weather events, and shifting agricultural conditions pose existential threats to our way of life”  “This project is not just about responding to climate change; it is about transforming our approach to development and resource management. It is about ensuring that our economic growth does not come at the expense of our environment. It is about fostering inclusive growth that benefits all Papua New Guineans, especially those most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.” He added. David commended the visionary leadership of the Climate Change and Development Authority, Provincial Governments, Global Green Growth Institute, and the Government of Australia in spearheading the Climate FIRST initiative. He particularly lauded Australia's AUD 20 million investment in the project, emphasizing its significance in fostering bilateral cooperation to combat the impacts of climate change. “Climate FIRST will build on the success of the initial four-year UAD 6 million DFAT funded Climate Resilient Green Growth Project (CRGG) that was implemented by GGGI between 2019 and 2023. This project which was fully completed in June 2023 was piloted in Enga, Milne Bay and New Ireland province resulting in the adoption of CRGG strategies and action plans in these provinces.” “The project had among other results mobilized USD 24 million in climate investments which included the USD 10 million Adaptation for Small Scale Agriculture (ASSA) project and the establishment of the Credit Guarantee Corporation (CGC) with USD 14 million equity from Kumul Holdings and Bank of Papua New Guinea. This initiative will now be scaled up under Climate FIRST to include four more provinces which include Eastern Highlands, Manus, Morobe, and Chimbu bringing the total provinces under Climate FIRST to seven, which is one third of PNG's total provinces and population.” He added. David hailed the government's unwavering commitment to partnership at all levels, emphasizing its role in advancing a greener economy and fostering resilience. He lauded the collaborative efforts of all stakeholders, citing Climate FIRST as a beacon of hope in PNG's journey towards a greener, more secure future. The purpose of the project's inception meeting, as outlined by David, is to foster a shared understanding among stakeholders, laying a solid foundation for success. He emphasized the importance of stakeholder engagement and ownership in delivering key project components, including strengthened climate finance mechanisms and increased private sector engagement. “I believe that your workshop from yesterday has provided all stakeholders the opportunity to discuss these projects aspects and scope in greater detail to foster a better understanding which will lead to a stronger stakeholder 'Buy-In" and ownership. This is essential for the project's success in delivering its key components including strengthened national coordinating mechanism for climate finance and investments, scaled up access to climate finance from blended financial sources including innovative financing mechanisms and increased private sector engagement, strengthened subnational CRGG policies and increased GEDSI (gender equity, disability and social inclusion) benefits.” “As you deliberate on the Governance set up of Climate FIRST today, as you commit each other in partnership to work together, closely, to mobilize the resources we need, let us also recognize that this delivery is a collective victory in itself. It is the testament to enduring partnerships, shared vision, and unwavering dedication to a cause that transcends borders and unites us all in a common purpose. He urged every stakeholder, including policymakers, private enterprises, local communities and international allies, to come together. “Let us forge ahead to deliver what we promised our people and environment. And that is, a greener economy for Papua New Guinea, is a step towards a more secure, prosperous, inclusive, and sustainable future for our country.” As deliberations on Climate FIRST's governance structure continue, he extended special thanks to the Government of Australia for its steadfast commitment and acknowledged the collaboration of the Ministry and delivery partner, GGGI, in driving the project forward. About the Climate FIRST Initiative: Australia and PNG collaborative efforts The Climate FIRST initiative was launched jointly by the Prime Ministers of Australia, Hon. Anthony Albanese, and the PM of PNG, Hon. James Marape earlier this year, during their Annual Leader’s Dialogue in Camberra on 8 February 2024. The initiative aims to enhance PNG's access to climate finance and investments, thereby fortifying climate resilience and promoting low-carbon development. With Australia's substantial funding commitment of AUD 20 million (PGK50 million), funding for the four-year project, spanning from March 2024 to March 2028, the project is poised to catalyze transformative change across the nation. The project's comprehensive approach, encompassing stakeholder engagement, governance reforms, and strategic investments, reflects a shared commitment to sustainable development and environmental stewardship. In the final day of the inception workshop, Nic Johnson emphasized the collaborative efforts between Australia and PNG in tackling climate change. He underscored Australia's unwavering commitment to supporting PNG and the wider Pacific community amidst the challenges posed by climate change. Highlighting the significance of the partnership, Jonnson reiterated Australian Prime Minister’s assertion that Australia stands in solidarity with the people of PNG, expressing a steadfast commitment to aiding the nation in its climate resilience efforts. He commended the cooperation between PNG and Australia to take action against climate change, under the PNG-Australia Climate Change Action Plan, which was established at the ministerial level. Adding on he said, since its inception, Australia has contributed over $100 million towards climate change mitigation and disaster resilience initiatives in PNG. These funds have been allocated to various sectors, including infrastructure, transportation, healthcare, and education, aimed at supporting PNG's capacity to withstand the impacts of climate change. “That includes mainly in infrastructure, so looking at transport, health and education and disaster risk reduction. So we will continue to take a climate change perspective to all our infrastructure investments going forward. Overall, Australia has committed about AUD $2 billion towards climate financing in the Pacific, and that will be spent between 2020 and 2025.” Furthermore, building upon past achievements, Jonnson unveiled the Climate FIRST initiative, designed to strengthen PNG's ability to secure international climate finance and advance its National Adaptation Plan. The initiative aims to facilitate the development of high-quality project proposals aligned with PNG's priorities in agriculture, energy, transportation, and infrastructure. As a significant milestone, he emphasized on the crucial role of involvement of provincial administrators and leaders, in driving effective climate action.  He expressed optimism that Climate FIRST would empower communities to confront the realities of climate change head-on and access vital resources for resilience-building projects.
June 10, 2024
As Papua New Guinea takes its course towards a sustainable, climate-resilient future, the Climate FIRST Project stands as a point, to the power of partnership, innovation, and collective action in tackling the defining challenge of our time. Climate resilience and sustainable development was marked by the Climate FIRST Inception Workshop and the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signing, uniting the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), Climate Change and Development Authority (CCDA), and seven provinces in PNG. The inception workshop, held from June 3rd to 4th at the Hilton Hotel, Port Moresby, served as a pivotal platform for strategic discussions and collaborative agreements aimed at supporting climate finance and resilience across the nation. The project is implemented in partnership between the CCDA, GGGI, the Australian High Commission (AHC) on behalf of the department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australia, and Provincial Administration of seven provinces which are Eastern Highlands, Enga, Manus, Milne Bay, Morobe, New Ireland and Simbu. The partnership and participation between organisers and stakeholders emphasized the urgency of addressing climate change's adverse impacts on PNG's rich and natural ecosystems. The two-day event commenced with deliberative sessions aimed at making clear the project's objectives, expected outcomes, and associated risks. It was also the first opportunity to bring all stakeholders together to discuss implementation arrangements at the national and provincial level. Key sessions on the first day encompassed comprehensive discussions on Climate FIRST's overarching goals, governance structure, stakeholder roles, and progress updates on green investment pipelines. The engagements fostered a deeper understanding among stakeholders, laying the groundwork for effective collaboration and decision-making. The second day featured a formal inception meeting, highlighted by a momentous signing ceremony of MOUs between CCDA, GGGI, and the seven participating provinces. Attendees included Nic Johnson, Counsellor (Enonomics), Australian High Commission and Motsy David, First Secretary, on behalf of Hon. Simo Kilepa, Minister for Environment, Conservation and Climate Change, underscoring the significance of collective action in addressing climate challenges.  Crucial sessions on the second day included discussions on governance structures, provincial capacities, and future action plans, reinforcing the commitment of all parties to uphold transparency, accountability, and sustainable development principles. The event drew over 50 participants from diplomatic corps, donor partners, government representatives, civil society organizations, and academia, signaling broad-based support for Climate FIRST's ambitious objectives. During the Inception Workshop First Secretary Motsy David gave the keynote speech on behalf of Hon. Simo Kilepa MP, Minister for Environment, Conservation and Climate Change delivered the keynote speech, advocating for transformative climate action. First Secretary Motsy David underscored the transformative potential of the Climate FIRST initiative, emphasizing its pivotal role in reshaping PNG's approach to development and resource management. David's remarks resonated with a diverse audience of stakeholders, highlighting the project's ambitious objectives and the collective commitment required to address climate change challenges. “Climate change is no longer a distant threat but a present reality that affects every facet of our lives. Our Communities, rich in culture and tradition, our pristine natural landscapes, and our diverse ecosystems are increasingly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of changing climate patterns. Rising sea levels, extreme weather events, and shifting agricultural conditions pose existential threats to our way of life”  “This project is not just about responding to climate change; it is about transforming our approach to development and resource management. It is about ensuring that our economic growth does not come at the expense of our environment. It is about fostering inclusive growth that benefits all Papua New Guineans, especially those most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.” He added. David commended the visionary leadership of the Climate Change and Development Authority, Provincial Governments, Global Green Growth Institute, and the Government of Australia in spearheading the Climate FIRST initiative. He particularly lauded Australia's AUD 20 million investment in the project, emphasizing its significance in fostering bilateral cooperation to combat the impacts of climate change. “Climate FIRST will build on the success of the initial four-year UAD 6 million DFAT funded Climate Resilient Green Growth Project (CRGG) that was implemented by GGGI between 2019 and 2023. This project which was fully completed in June 2023 was piloted in Enga, Milne Bay and New Ireland province resulting in the adoption of CRGG strategies and action plans in these provinces.” “The project had among other results mobilized USD 24 million in climate investments which included the USD 10 million Adaptation for Small Scale Agriculture (ASSA) project and the establishment of the Credit Guarantee Corporation (CGC) with USD 14 million equity from Kumul Holdings and Bank of Papua New Guinea. This initiative will now be scaled up under Climate FIRST to include four more provinces which include Eastern Highlands, Manus, Morobe, and Chimbu bringing the total provinces under Climate FIRST to seven, which is one third of PNG's total provinces and population.” He added. David hailed the government's unwavering commitment to partnership at all levels, emphasizing its role in advancing a greener economy and fostering resilience. He lauded the collaborative efforts of all stakeholders, citing Climate FIRST as a beacon of hope in PNG's journey towards a greener, more secure future. The purpose of the project's inception meeting, as outlined by David, is to foster a shared understanding among stakeholders, laying a solid foundation for success. He emphasized the importance of stakeholder engagement and ownership in delivering key project components, including strengthened climate finance mechanisms and increased private sector engagement. “I believe that your workshop from yesterday has provided all stakeholders the opportunity to discuss these projects aspects and scope in greater detail to foster a better understanding which will lead to a stronger stakeholder 'Buy-In" and ownership. This is essential for the project's success in delivering its key components including strengthened national coordinating mechanism for climate finance and investments, scaled up access to climate finance from blended financial sources including innovative financing mechanisms and increased private sector engagement, strengthened subnational CRGG policies and increased GEDSI (gender equity, disability and social inclusion) benefits.” “As you deliberate on the Governance set up of Climate FIRST today, as you commit each other in partnership to work together, closely, to mobilize the resources we need, let us also recognize that this delivery is a collective victory in itself. It is the testament to enduring partnerships, shared vision, and unwavering dedication to a cause that transcends borders and unites us all in a common purpose. He urged every stakeholder, including policymakers, private enterprises, local communities and international allies, to come together. “Let us forge ahead to deliver what we promised our people and environment. And that is, a greener economy for Papua New Guinea, is a step towards a more secure, prosperous, inclusive, and sustainable future for our country.” As deliberations on Climate FIRST's governance structure continue, he extended special thanks to the Government of Australia for its steadfast commitment and acknowledged the collaboration of the Ministry and delivery partner, GGGI, in driving the project forward. About the Climate FIRST Initiative: Australia and PNG collaborative efforts The Climate FIRST initiative was launched jointly by the Prime Ministers of Australia, Hon. Anthony Albanese, and the PM of PNG, Hon. James Marape earlier this year, during their Annual Leader’s Dialogue in Camberra on 8 February 2024. The initiative aims to enhance PNG's access to climate finance and investments, thereby fortifying climate resilience and promoting low-carbon development. With Australia's substantial funding commitment of AUD 20 million (PGK50 million), funding for the four-year project, spanning from March 2024 to March 2028, the project is poised to catalyze transformative change across the nation. The project's comprehensive approach, encompassing stakeholder engagement, governance reforms, and strategic investments, reflects a shared commitment to sustainable development and environmental stewardship. In the final day of the inception workshop, Nic Johnson emphasized the collaborative efforts between Australia and PNG in tackling climate change. He underscored Australia's unwavering commitment to supporting PNG and the wider Pacific community amidst the challenges posed by climate change. Highlighting the significance of the partnership, Jonnson reiterated Australian Prime Minister’s assertion that Australia stands in solidarity with the people of PNG, expressing a steadfast commitment to aiding the nation in its climate resilience efforts. He commended the cooperation between PNG and Australia to take action against climate change, under the PNG-Australia Climate Change Action Plan, which was established at the ministerial level. Adding on he said, since its inception, Australia has contributed over $100 million towards climate change mitigation and disaster resilience initiatives in PNG. These funds have been allocated to various sectors, including infrastructure, transportation, healthcare, and education, aimed at supporting PNG's capacity to withstand the impacts of climate change. “That includes mainly in infrastructure, so looking at transport, health and education and disaster risk reduction. So we will continue to take a climate change perspective to all our infrastructure investments going forward. Overall, Australia has committed about AUD $2 billion towards climate financing in the Pacific, and that will be spent between 2020 and 2025.” Furthermore, building upon past achievements, Jonnson unveiled the Climate FIRST initiative, designed to strengthen PNG's ability to secure international climate finance and advance its National Adaptation Plan. The initiative aims to facilitate the development of high-quality project proposals aligned with PNG's priorities in agriculture, energy, transportation, and infrastructure. As a significant milestone, he emphasized on the crucial role of involvement of provincial administrators and leaders, in driving effective climate action.  He expressed optimism that Climate FIRST would empower communities to confront the realities of climate change head-on and access vital resources for resilience-building projects.
June 04, 2024
In a significant development regarding the Porgera Mining Project, the State Team overseeing the Community Development Agreement (CDA) negotiations has provided an indefinite time-off to the concerned parties for them to review and offer feedback on the draft CDA document before the negotiations recommence. The document contains various benefits for landowners and stakeholders stemming from the anticipated new Porgera Mine. It is a pivotal agreement as it is a process by which landowners and stakeholder can negotiate and distribute benefits. The expected benefits from the State and New Porgera Limited (NPL) include royalties, equity, Infrastructure Development Grants (IDG), Special Support Grants (SSG) and business spin-off opportunities, among others. The process follows the Mining Act of 1992 and various other laws that govern the CDA negotiations, and stakeholders must be mindful of the relevant laws when negotiating benefits. A CDA is a legal agreement entered into by the company and affected mine communities and approved pursuant to these regulations. The state has previously met with the special mining lease landowners, Lease for Mining Purposes Minerals for Life landowners, the Enga Provincial Government and the Porgera Rural Local Level Government. Key stakeholders in this negotiation process include the Special Mining Lease (SML) landowners, New Porgera Limited (NPL), Enga Provincial Government, the State, and the Porgera Rural Local Level Government. Acknowledging the broader impact, non-SML landowners, including those holding Lease for Mining Purposes (LMP), Mining Easements (ME), Hides-Porgera Power Line landowners, and the Riverine impact communities, received the opportunity to scrutinize the draft document. Despite not being direct parties to the CDA, these non-SML landowners stand to benefit from the mining operations. To ensure inclusivity and equitable distribution of benefits, Jerry Garry, the Managing Director of the Mineral Resources Authority (MRA), echoed the sentiments expressed by the Governor for Enga Province, Sir Peter Ipatas, urging SML landowners to consider the interests of non-SML landowners in the equity-sharing arrangements. Mr. Garry emphasized that certain aspects of the draft document might warrant immediate decisions based on existing policies and laws, while others might necessitate deliberation at the National Executive Council (NEC) level. Mr. Garry acclaimed it as the most advantageous arrangement in the nation's 49-year mining history. He lauded the leadership of Prime Minister Hon. James Marape MP and Governor Sir Ipatas for their pivotal roles in securing the deal, which endows the country with a 51% equity stake in the project. In distributing the draft document to the parties, Mr Garry told them there would be certain things which the parties may want as part of their review, which that the state team can make decisions on immediately based on policy and law. However, other things may require the National Executive Council’s (NEC) decision. The dissemination of the draft CDA document signifies a crucial juncture in the ongoing negotiations, underscoring the commitment towards fostering transparency, inclusivity, and equitable distribution of benefits among all stakeholders involved in the Porgera Mining Project. Enga Province Governor Urges Swift Action on Porgera Mining Project CDA Enga Province Governor, Hon Sir Peter Ipatas, convened the crucial CDA meeting on May 22 at the Enga Teachers’ College in Wabag, welcoming key stakeholders. Governor Ipatas emphasized the importance of fairness, understanding, and consensus building among the parties to expedite the process of reaching mutual benefits. He underscored the necessity for all stakeholders to agree and sign the CDA, which serves as the framework for negotiating and distributing benefits arising from the Porgera Mine operations. Highlighting the urgency of the situation, Sir Ipatas warned that delays in finalizing the CDA could result in missed opportunities for landowners, including lucrative contracts and business spin-offs. With the Porgera mine already operational, swift action is imperative to ensure that communities can begin to reap the benefits outlined in the agreement. The Governor called upon the National Government to consider the interests of Lease for Mining Purposes (LMP) landowners and impact communities, stressing the importance of their inclusion in the negotiation process. Hon. Ipatas urged all parties to prioritize the collective interest and refrain from prolonging the negotiation process. The meeting concluded with a commitment from all stakeholders to work diligently towards a swift resolution, with the understanding that timely action is essential to realizing the socio-economic potential of the Porgera Mining Project for the benefit of all involved parties. As negotiations continue, the Enga Province remains poised for progress, guided by the vision of equitable development and sustainable growth, the governor said. State Explains PPCA The State Team engaged in the Porgera Mining Project CDA in Wabag, Enga Province explained to the Porgera Landowners Association (PLOA) that by law, only parties to the Porgera Project Commencement Agreement (PPCA) and associated agreements could have copies of the agreements. According to a press release provided by the Mineral Resources Authority in May 22, the Deputy State Solicitor Bonny Gelu said the law protected the agreements and that there were legal and financial implications surrounding access to these agreements. “If you signed the agreement, you can have copies. If you didn’t the sign the agreements, you cannot have copies,” explained Mr Gelu. He asked the PLOA to inform the State if they had signed any of the agreements and if so, they should identify the particular agreements they had signed so that the State could locate and make copies available. In addition, the State pointed out that the PLOA and the EPG are shareholders of Mineral Resources Enga, which means they own MRE. Since the MRE, is a party to the PPCA and associated agreements, the PLOA and EPG can easily get copies from their own entity that represents them as shareholders and owners. Mr Gelu said New Porgera Limited (NPL) had circulated to all stakeholders of the CDA a summary of the benefits contained in the PPCA and associated agreements, which could be incorporated into the CDA template. The PLOA also asked the State to identify who the parties to the CDA were. In response the State through Mr Gelu, explained that according to section 98 and 99 of the Organic Law on Provincial Government & Local Level Government, the parties are the Special Mining Lease (SML) landowners, the Porgera Rural Local Level Government and the Enga Provincial Government (EPG). However, Mr Gelu explained that this did not mean that non-SML landowners like the Lease for Mining Purposes (LMP), Mining Easement (ME) and Riverine communities could not benefit. He said non SML landowners would still benefit from the project except that they could not become parties to the CDA. Chairman of the CDA negotiations Winterford Eko, explained to all parties that section 5 of the Mining Act 1992, states that all minerals in the country is owned by the National Government. He said this meant that the National Government as the owner of all minerals has the legal authority to negotiate deals with investors at the highest level. He said the PPCA was therefore negotiated at the National Government level, adding that that the CDA parties could only negotiate based on what had already been agreed at the State level. The parties agreed to postpone the meeting to May 23, so that the State Team could have internal consultations to find ways forward to address the PLOA’s wish to have copies of the PPCA and other agreements.
June 04, 2024
The Mineral Resources Development Company Limited (MRDC) and Twinza recently announced they have executed agreements for MRDC to acquire an up to 50% Participating Interest in Twinza’s Pasca A Project, and for both parties to cooperate in the acquisition and development of future oil and gas opportunities in Papua New Guinea. In a statement, MRDC, Twinza Oil Limited, and Twinza Oil (PNG) Limited said they have obtained all internal approvals and executed a series of binding agreements for MRDC to take an up to 50% Participating Interest in the Pasca A Development Project. The Agreements, including a Joint Operating Agreement, will become fully effective upon, among other conditions, receipt of PNG Independent Consumer and Competition Commission (ICCC) approval and the execution of a satisfactory Gas Agreement for the Pasca-A Project. MRDC may purchase up to a 50% Participating Interest in Twinza’s Pasca-A Assets, with Twinza remaining the Pasca-A Project Operator, the statement added. Commenting on the announcement, Prime Minister Hon. James Marape said: “I welcome the transaction between MRDC and Twinza to develop the Pasca A asset and to work together on a number of other exciting opportunities in the Gulf of Papua region and the country.” “Pasca is one of our government’s priority major energy projects in PNG and we look forward to seeing MRDC and Twinza work together to develop the project for the benefit of the people of PNG,” PM Marape added. MRDC Managing Director Augustine Mano said: “I am very pleased to announce this significant transaction which represents another important stepping stone in MRDC’s evolution towards a more engaged and active asset owner and manager.” “We are delighted to be working with the team at Twinza and look forward to progressing Pasca A and many other exciting opportunities in the months and years ahead.” Twinza Executive Chairman Stephen Quantrill said: “I am very pleased to be able to announce execution of these Agreements to work and collaborate with MRDC in the development of oil and gas assets in PNG, starting with our fully appraised, ready-to-go Pasca A project in the Gulf of Papua.” “We thank Prime Minster Marape and the government of PNG for their support and look forward to working with Augustine Mano, John Tuaim and their team at MRDC for the future success of the Pasca A Project and towards the development of other oil and gas assets in Papua New Guinea.” “Pasca A, when operational, is expected to generate more than K500 million per year to the PNG State, generate around 500 permanent jobs and bring significant US Dollars of foreign currency into the PNG economy. Twinza stands ready to proceed with Pasca Phase 1 FEED as soon as the Pasca Gas Agreement is executed and the Project Development Licence is awarded.” The Pasca A Development Project is a large FEED-ready offshore project in the Gulf of Papua. Twinza, 100% owner of the Project, applied for the Petroleum Development Licence (PDL) in June 2015, has complied with all Government requests and has been steadily advancing the project while negotiating the Gas Agreement since 2020. The Pasca A field is fully appraised with four wells having been drilled in the field, resources independently assessed by Gaffney, Cline & Associates, pre-FEED studies completed, and the project will enter FEED following the approval of the Pasca Gas Agreement. Twinza has to-date invested over K400 million in the Project in anticipation of permitting and fiscal certainty and continues to work diligently on the Project. In 2023 the company announced a 35% increase in total resource size (almost doubling the benefits of the project to the State) and validated Carbon Dioxide sequestration potential of 200 million tonnes of CO2 making it potentially the first carbon negative hydrocarbon project in PNG. The project is expected to contribute over K30 Billion to Papua New Guinea’s economy and K15 Billion revenue to the country over its life.
June 04, 2024
The Mineral Resources Development Company Limited (MRDC) and Twinza recently announced they have executed agreements for MRDC to acquire an up to 50% Participating Interest in Twinza’s Pasca A Project, and for both parties to cooperate in the acquisition and development of future oil and gas opportunities in Papua New Guinea. In a statement, MRDC, Twinza Oil Limited, and Twinza Oil (PNG) Limited said they have obtained all internal approvals and executed a series of binding agreements for MRDC to take an up to 50% Participating Interest in the Pasca A Development Project. The Agreements, including a Joint Operating Agreement, will become fully effective upon, among other conditions, receipt of PNG Independent Consumer and Competition Commission (ICCC) approval and the execution of a satisfactory Gas Agreement for the Pasca-A Project. MRDC may purchase up to a 50% Participating Interest in Twinza’s Pasca-A Assets, with Twinza remaining the Pasca-A Project Operator, the statement added. Commenting on the announcement, Prime Minister Hon. James Marape said: “I welcome the transaction between MRDC and Twinza to develop the Pasca A asset and to work together on a number of other exciting opportunities in the Gulf of Papua region and the country.” “Pasca is one of our government’s priority major energy projects in PNG and we look forward to seeing MRDC and Twinza work together to develop the project for the benefit of the people of PNG,” PM Marape added. MRDC Managing Director Augustine Mano said: “I am very pleased to announce this significant transaction which represents another important stepping stone in MRDC’s evolution towards a more engaged and active asset owner and manager.” “We are delighted to be working with the team at Twinza and look forward to progressing Pasca A and many other exciting opportunities in the months and years ahead.” Twinza Executive Chairman Stephen Quantrill said: “I am very pleased to be able to announce execution of these Agreements to work and collaborate with MRDC in the development of oil and gas assets in PNG, starting with our fully appraised, ready-to-go Pasca A project in the Gulf of Papua.” “We thank Prime Minster Marape and the government of PNG for their support and look forward to working with Augustine Mano, John Tuaim and their team at MRDC for the future success of the Pasca A Project and towards the development of other oil and gas assets in Papua New Guinea.” “Pasca A, when operational, is expected to generate more than K500 million per year to the PNG State, generate around 500 permanent jobs and bring significant US Dollars of foreign currency into the PNG economy. Twinza stands ready to proceed with Pasca Phase 1 FEED as soon as the Pasca Gas Agreement is executed and the Project Development Licence is awarded.” The Pasca A Development Project is a large FEED-ready offshore project in the Gulf of Papua. Twinza, 100% owner of the Project, applied for the Petroleum Development Licence (PDL) in June 2015, has complied with all Government requests and has been steadily advancing the project while negotiating the Gas Agreement since 2020. The Pasca A field is fully appraised with four wells having been drilled in the field, resources independently assessed by Gaffney, Cline & Associates, pre-FEED studies completed, and the project will enter FEED following the approval of the Pasca Gas Agreement. Twinza has to-date invested over K400 million in the Project in anticipation of permitting and fiscal certainty and continues to work diligently on the Project. In 2023 the company announced a 35% increase in total resource size (almost doubling the benefits of the project to the State) and validated Carbon Dioxide sequestration potential of 200 million tonnes of CO2 making it potentially the first carbon negative hydrocarbon project in PNG. The project is expected to contribute over K30 Billion to Papua New Guinea’s economy and K15 Billion revenue to the country over its life.
April 15, 2024
In the ever-evolving development sectors of sustainable energy, mastering the installation of solar energy systems is both a skill and a necessity. With advancements and innovations occurring at a rapid pace, being informed with developments are crucial for companies in the electrical and solar industry. The Sustainable Energy Industry Association Papua New Guinea (SEAP) recently hosted a pivotal workshop in partnership with the Sustainable Energy Industry Association of Pacific Islands (SEIAPI) and the United States Agency for International Development PNG Electrification Project (USAID-PEP). Held on the 5th of April at the USAID-PEP office in Port Moresby, the event titled “SEIAPI/SEAP/USAID-PEP Solar Standards Workshop” brought together 60 participants from solar and electrical companies, government agencies, international donor organizations, and academia. The USAID-PEP Chief of Party Bruce Corbet highlighted the importance of mini-grids and small-scale electrification in achieving PNG’s electrification goals. Mr Corbet said, “This is one of the steps we are taking as more people join. And it is really important, this message, ‘that mini-grids and small-scale electrification is a fundamental part of electrifying Papua New Guinea’ and achieving the government’s goal of that 70% access target by 2030.” He emphasized the necessity of partnerships and capacity development for such initiative. USAID-PEP seeks to enable the creation of PNG’s mini-grid development industry. The workshop is for capacity development, including an opportunity to network with potential partners in the industry. The workshop lasted 1 hour and 30 minutes and participants were immersed with information and knowledge, guided by a “Standards Presentation,” followed by a question-and-answer session and a few minutes of industrial networking. The workshop, held both in person and online by Zoom, served as a platform of knowledge and collaboration, shedding light on solar energy installation. SEIAPI Executive Officer, Geoff Stapleton, a distinguished pioneer of the Australian solar industry, led the workshop with commendable expertise and insight. In collaboration with SEAP and USAID-PEP teams, Stapleton’s presentation delved deep into the topics such as design and product standards, solar energy standards, safety practices, and installation techniques. The presentation focused on critical standards and guidelines regarding solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, with a specific focus on design, installation, and product standards. Stapleton also provided a comprehensive overview of essential standards. From AS 4509.1:2009 to AS/NZS 4777.1:2016, each standard was explained with a visual guide, emphasizing its significance and implications for solar designers and installers. Stapleton’s pivotal role in the development and refinement of solar industry standards was evident, showcasing his expertise and commitment to ensuring installation practices and safety measures are carried out during installation based on both specification and requirements. The workshop's agenda covered a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from stand-alone power systems to grid connection requirements. Attendees also participated in the presentation by discussion, which they gained insights into system designed complexity, safety requirements for PV (photovoltaic) arrays or solar arrays, and electrical installations involving battery systems. Moreover, the presentation highlighted the inter-relation between various standards, emphasizing their collective role in ensuring the safety and effectiveness of solar energy systems. One of the workshop's key takeaways was the importance of compliance with industry standards. With safety being a paramount concern, adherence to standards such as AS/NZS 5033:2021 and AS/NZS 5139:2019 is imperative for companies operating in the electrical and solar industry. In addition, the workshop underscored the critical role of training and recognition schemes in fostering a culture of excellence and professionalism within the industry, especially in an industry where precision and compliance are paramount.
April 15, 2024
In the ever-evolving development sectors of sustainable energy, mastering the installation of solar energy systems is both a skill and a necessity. With advancements and innovations occurring at a rapid pace, being informed with developments are crucial for companies in the electrical and solar industry. The Sustainable Energy Industry Association Papua New Guinea (SEAP) recently hosted a pivotal workshop in partnership with the Sustainable Energy Industry Association of Pacific Islands (SEIAPI) and the United States Agency for International Development PNG Electrification Project (USAID-PEP). Held on the 5th of April at the USAID-PEP office in Port Moresby, the event titled “SEIAPI/SEAP/USAID-PEP Solar Standards Workshop” brought together 60 participants from solar and electrical companies, government agencies, international donor organizations, and academia. The USAID-PEP Chief of Party Bruce Corbet highlighted the importance of mini-grids and small-scale electrification in achieving PNG’s electrification goals. Mr Corbet said, “This is one of the steps we are taking as more people join. And it is really important, this message, ‘that mini-grids and small-scale electrification is a fundamental part of electrifying Papua New Guinea’ and achieving the government’s goal of that 70% access target by 2030.” He emphasized the necessity of partnerships and capacity development for such initiative. USAID-PEP seeks to enable the creation of PNG’s mini-grid development industry. The workshop is for capacity development, including an opportunity to network with potential partners in the industry. The workshop lasted 1 hour and 30 minutes and participants were immersed with information and knowledge, guided by a “Standards Presentation,” followed by a question-and-answer session and a few minutes of industrial networking. The workshop, held both in person and online by Zoom, served as a platform of knowledge and collaboration, shedding light on solar energy installation. SEIAPI Executive Officer, Geoff Stapleton, a distinguished pioneer of the Australian solar industry, led the workshop with commendable expertise and insight. In collaboration with SEAP and USAID-PEP teams, Stapleton’s presentation delved deep into the topics such as design and product standards, solar energy standards, safety practices, and installation techniques. The presentation focused on critical standards and guidelines regarding solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, with a specific focus on design, installation, and product standards. Stapleton also provided a comprehensive overview of essential standards. From AS 4509.1:2009 to AS/NZS 4777.1:2016, each standard was explained with a visual guide, emphasizing its significance and implications for solar designers and installers. Stapleton’s pivotal role in the development and refinement of solar industry standards was evident, showcasing his expertise and commitment to ensuring installation practices and safety measures are carried out during installation based on both specification and requirements. The workshop's agenda covered a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from stand-alone power systems to grid connection requirements. Attendees also participated in the presentation by discussion, which they gained insights into system designed complexity, safety requirements for PV (photovoltaic) arrays or solar arrays, and electrical installations involving battery systems. Moreover, the presentation highlighted the inter-relation between various standards, emphasizing their collective role in ensuring the safety and effectiveness of solar energy systems. One of the workshop's key takeaways was the importance of compliance with industry standards. With safety being a paramount concern, adherence to standards such as AS/NZS 5033:2021 and AS/NZS 5139:2019 is imperative for companies operating in the electrical and solar industry. In addition, the workshop underscored the critical role of training and recognition schemes in fostering a culture of excellence and professionalism within the industry, especially in an industry where precision and compliance are paramount.
June 10, 2024
Prime Minister Hon. James Marape and Government MPs marked the 2024 World Environment Day by planting trees along Independence Boulevard in Port Moresby recently before heading to Parliament. The event was organised by the National Capital District Commission and Governor Hon. Powes Parkop. In his address, Prime Minister Marape urged all Papua New Guineans to plant a tree a year and logging companies to plant four trees for every tree they chop down. “In the midst of the current political landscape, we, as a government, have gathered here to plant a tree in honour of this significant day,” stated Prime Minister Marape. “Trees produce oxygen. Oxygen gives life. “If God was to charge us for the oxygen we breathe, we would neither have the money to pay for this, nor would we survive. “I want to encourage every Papua New Guinean right across the country to plant one tree a year. “When you cut down a tree, are you planting a new tree? Where were you when the tree was planted? “We must reflect on this on World Environment Day today and going forward. “We must be a nation that plants trees. “To our logging companies: Law requires that when you cut down one tree, you plant four. “I hope we are monitoring this as the Executive Government, through the Forests Department, enforced the policy that if you cut down one tree, you plant four trees.” Highlighting the crucial role of trees in sustaining human life by providing essential oxygen, Prime Minister Marape emphasised the importance of initiatives like the tree-planting program. The programme aims to plant one million trees across Port Moresby, and he encouraged all citizens to join in this green endeavor. Prime Minister Marape commended this year’s World Environment Day theme: ‘Land Restoration, Desertification, and Drought Resilience – Our Land, Our Future, We are Generation Restoration’.
May 20, 2024
The Bank of Papua New Guinea (BPNG) welcomed a distinguished ministerial delegation from New Zealand to discuss the progress and initiatives of the Green Finance Centre (GFC) in the context of climate resilience in Papua New Guinea. The meeting, held on May 13, 2024, underscored the pivotal role of green finance in addressing climate change challenges facing the island nation. The round table discussion facilitated an exchange of insights among officials from the New Zealand Ministerial Delegation, BPNG, the Climate Change Development Authority (CCDA), and the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Led by the New Zealand Minister of Climate Change, Hon. Simon Watt, MP, the NZ delegation commended the BPNG for its leadership in establishing foundational structures for green finance in PNG noting that the Central Bank can be can be proud of this. Hon. Watts emphasized that climate change is fundamentally an economic issue. He added that New Zealand, which is also advancing its Green Taxonomy, is eager to assist the Green Finance Centre in harmonizing its Inclusive Green Taxonomy. "The New Zealand Government is impressed with the Bank of Papua New Guinea’s approach to creating a resilient and stable financial system," Hon. Watts stated. He expressed New Zealand's interest in collaborating with like-minded countries in the green finance sector, noting that both countries experience the impact of climate events with similar intensity, thereby presenting mutual opportunities for assistance in adaptation and mitigation efforts. PNG, being an island nation, faces heightened vulnerability to climate crisis such as floods, droughts, rising sea levels, and strong winds. The collaboration between the New Zealand government and BPNG aims to address these challenges by integrating green finance policies into the country's financial ecosystem. Mrs. Elizabeth Genia, Governor of the BPNG, conveyed through Deputy Governor Mr. Jeffrey Yabom, a message to the Ministerial delegation emphasizing BPNG's mission to serve the people of PNG. This mission involves implementing effective monetary policy and maintaining a sound and inclusive financial system, she noted, highlighting the systemic implications of climate-related events and policy changes on financial markets and underscoring the need for proactive measures to address climate-related risks. In response to climate change-related issues, the BPNG is dedicated to playing a pivotal role in safeguarding market stability by proactively addressing climate-related risks and strengthening resilience. Bank of PNG, Assistant Governor, Mr George Awab, who is also the Chair of the Steering Committee for the Green Finance Centre, stressed a focus on normalizing required finance not only at the international level but also domestically.  Getting the support from the New Zealand government is to develop the Green Climate Center, which is the key Agency, he said. The establishment of the Green Finance Centre, supported by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) and the Centre for Excellence in Financial Inclusion (CEFI), marks a significant milestone in promoting green growth and economic diversification in Papua New Guinea.   Funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) under the Low Emission Climate Resilient Development (LECRD) program, the GFC aims to integrate inclusive green finance policies into lending operations, fostering financial inclusion and sustainable investment activities. In partnership with the Centre for Excellence in Financial Inclusion (CEFI), GGGI developed the Inclusive Green Finance Policy (IGFP) in 2023. This initiative, funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) with a grant of USD 670,000 under the Low Emission Climate Resilient Development (LECRD) program, led to the establishment of the GFC. The GFC is mandated to implement the IGFP and Roadmap and oversee other green finance initiatives in the country aimed at mitigating climate-related risks, promoting green finance, and catalyzing investments towards a more sustainable future. The primary goal of the project is to develop and integrate the Inclusive Green Finance Policy (IGFP) into the lending operations of financial institutions. This integration aims to create a financial ecosystem conducive to financial inclusion, green growth in investment activities, and economic diversification, which in turn will lead to an increase in green jobs. Hon. Watts reiterated New Zealand's commitment to advancing green finance initiatives and expressed eagerness to collaborate with Papua New Guinea on harmonizing green taxonomies. He emphasized the economic dimensions of climate change, stating, "The way we address today's pressing climate issues will shape our future." The significant roundtable meeting was attended by, New Zealand Delegation; Hon. Simon, Watts, Minister of Climate Change, Hon. Dr Shane Reti, Minister of Health, and Minister for Pacific People. New Zealand MPs Hon. Tim van de Molen, MP and Chair of the Foreign Affairs, Defense and Trade Committee, and Hon. David Parker, an MP for the Labour Party (not current in Government) and opposition spokesperson for Foreign Affairs, were present. Gerardine Clifford, Chief Executive, Ministry for Pacific Peoples, Charlie Gillard, Deputy High Commissioner, New Zealand High Commission and Laura Holder, First Secretary, New Zealand High Commission were also with the delegation. Accompanying the NZ delegates were Jessica Rowe, Private Secretary, Minister of Climate Change; Nelson Tiatia, Private Secretary to Minister Reti; Charlotte Gendall, Press Secretary to Minister Reti; Ramphaey Gime, Development Programme Coordinator; and Cynthia Duoribi, Policy Adviser. PNG delegation attendees included Mr Jeffrey Yabom, Deputy Governor BPNG; Mr George Awap, Asst. Governor BPNG and Chair Steering Committee GFC; Ms. Debra Sungi, Acting Managing Director, Climate Change and Development Authority; Mr. Mohinesh Prasad, Head of Green Finance Centre; Mr. Saliya Ranasinghe, Executive Director CEFI; Mr. Peter Samuel, Deputy Executive Director, CEFI; Mr. Peniamina  Leavai, Deputy Country Rep, GGGI PNG; and Mr. Angus Moina, SCA GFC. During the roundtable discussion, BPNG Assistant Governor Mr. Awap, who also serves as Chairperson of the Steering Committee for the Green Finance Centre, thanked the New Zealand Government for its regional leadership on climate change. Mr. Awap highlighted the critical role of the Green Finance Centre in fostering a sustainable financial ecosystem in PNG. Mr. Prasad, Head of the Green Finance Centre, updated the delegation on the significant progress the GFC has made and its forthcoming initiatives aimed at greening PNG’s financial system. Through leadership, guidance, and support, the Centre will mitigate climate-related risks, promote green finance, and catalyze investments toward a more sustainable future for PNG, he said. Key outcomes from the discussion include New Zealand's continued support for the Green Finance Centre's mandate and intentions to collaborate with Papua New Guinea on carbon markets. The collaborative efforts between the two nations reflect a shared commitment to building resilient and sustainable financial systems in the face of climate change challenges.
May 20, 2024
The Bank of Papua New Guinea (BPNG) welcomed a distinguished ministerial delegation from New Zealand to discuss the progress and initiatives of the Green Finance Centre (GFC) in the context of climate resilience in Papua New Guinea. The meeting, held on May 13, 2024, underscored the pivotal role of green finance in addressing climate change challenges facing the island nation. The round table discussion facilitated an exchange of insights among officials from the New Zealand Ministerial Delegation, BPNG, the Climate Change Development Authority (CCDA), and the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Led by the New Zealand Minister of Climate Change, Hon. Simon Watt, MP, the NZ delegation commended the BPNG for its leadership in establishing foundational structures for green finance in PNG noting that the Central Bank can be can be proud of this. Hon. Watts emphasized that climate change is fundamentally an economic issue. He added that New Zealand, which is also advancing its Green Taxonomy, is eager to assist the Green Finance Centre in harmonizing its Inclusive Green Taxonomy. "The New Zealand Government is impressed with the Bank of Papua New Guinea’s approach to creating a resilient and stable financial system," Hon. Watts stated. He expressed New Zealand's interest in collaborating with like-minded countries in the green finance sector, noting that both countries experience the impact of climate events with similar intensity, thereby presenting mutual opportunities for assistance in adaptation and mitigation efforts. PNG, being an island nation, faces heightened vulnerability to climate crisis such as floods, droughts, rising sea levels, and strong winds. The collaboration between the New Zealand government and BPNG aims to address these challenges by integrating green finance policies into the country's financial ecosystem. Mrs. Elizabeth Genia, Governor of the BPNG, conveyed through Deputy Governor Mr. Jeffrey Yabom, a message to the Ministerial delegation emphasizing BPNG's mission to serve the people of PNG. This mission involves implementing effective monetary policy and maintaining a sound and inclusive financial system, she noted, highlighting the systemic implications of climate-related events and policy changes on financial markets and underscoring the need for proactive measures to address climate-related risks. In response to climate change-related issues, the BPNG is dedicated to playing a pivotal role in safeguarding market stability by proactively addressing climate-related risks and strengthening resilience. Bank of PNG, Assistant Governor, Mr George Awab, who is also the Chair of the Steering Committee for the Green Finance Centre, stressed a focus on normalizing required finance not only at the international level but also domestically.  Getting the support from the New Zealand government is to develop the Green Climate Center, which is the key Agency, he said. The establishment of the Green Finance Centre, supported by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) and the Centre for Excellence in Financial Inclusion (CEFI), marks a significant milestone in promoting green growth and economic diversification in Papua New Guinea.   Funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) under the Low Emission Climate Resilient Development (LECRD) program, the GFC aims to integrate inclusive green finance policies into lending operations, fostering financial inclusion and sustainable investment activities. In partnership with the Centre for Excellence in Financial Inclusion (CEFI), GGGI developed the Inclusive Green Finance Policy (IGFP) in 2023. This initiative, funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) with a grant of USD 670,000 under the Low Emission Climate Resilient Development (LECRD) program, led to the establishment of the GFC. The GFC is mandated to implement the IGFP and Roadmap and oversee other green finance initiatives in the country aimed at mitigating climate-related risks, promoting green finance, and catalyzing investments towards a more sustainable future. The primary goal of the project is to develop and integrate the Inclusive Green Finance Policy (IGFP) into the lending operations of financial institutions. This integration aims to create a financial ecosystem conducive to financial inclusion, green growth in investment activities, and economic diversification, which in turn will lead to an increase in green jobs. Hon. Watts reiterated New Zealand's commitment to advancing green finance initiatives and expressed eagerness to collaborate with Papua New Guinea on harmonizing green taxonomies. He emphasized the economic dimensions of climate change, stating, "The way we address today's pressing climate issues will shape our future." The significant roundtable meeting was attended by, New Zealand Delegation; Hon. Simon, Watts, Minister of Climate Change, Hon. Dr Shane Reti, Minister of Health, and Minister for Pacific People. New Zealand MPs Hon. Tim van de Molen, MP and Chair of the Foreign Affairs, Defense and Trade Committee, and Hon. David Parker, an MP for the Labour Party (not current in Government) and opposition spokesperson for Foreign Affairs, were present. Gerardine Clifford, Chief Executive, Ministry for Pacific Peoples, Charlie Gillard, Deputy High Commissioner, New Zealand High Commission and Laura Holder, First Secretary, New Zealand High Commission were also with the delegation. Accompanying the NZ delegates were Jessica Rowe, Private Secretary, Minister of Climate Change; Nelson Tiatia, Private Secretary to Minister Reti; Charlotte Gendall, Press Secretary to Minister Reti; Ramphaey Gime, Development Programme Coordinator; and Cynthia Duoribi, Policy Adviser. PNG delegation attendees included Mr Jeffrey Yabom, Deputy Governor BPNG; Mr George Awap, Asst. Governor BPNG and Chair Steering Committee GFC; Ms. Debra Sungi, Acting Managing Director, Climate Change and Development Authority; Mr. Mohinesh Prasad, Head of Green Finance Centre; Mr. Saliya Ranasinghe, Executive Director CEFI; Mr. Peter Samuel, Deputy Executive Director, CEFI; Mr. Peniamina  Leavai, Deputy Country Rep, GGGI PNG; and Mr. Angus Moina, SCA GFC. During the roundtable discussion, BPNG Assistant Governor Mr. Awap, who also serves as Chairperson of the Steering Committee for the Green Finance Centre, thanked the New Zealand Government for its regional leadership on climate change. Mr. Awap highlighted the critical role of the Green Finance Centre in fostering a sustainable financial ecosystem in PNG. Mr. Prasad, Head of the Green Finance Centre, updated the delegation on the significant progress the GFC has made and its forthcoming initiatives aimed at greening PNG’s financial system. Through leadership, guidance, and support, the Centre will mitigate climate-related risks, promote green finance, and catalyze investments toward a more sustainable future for PNG, he said. Key outcomes from the discussion include New Zealand's continued support for the Green Finance Centre's mandate and intentions to collaborate with Papua New Guinea on carbon markets. The collaborative efforts between the two nations reflect a shared commitment to building resilient and sustainable financial systems in the face of climate change challenges.
June 10, 2024
Galomarubu village, along the Rigo coast nestled in the Rigo District of Central Province, lies an estimated 113 kilometers from bustling Port Moresby. Here, Esau Lui, the Owner and Director of Belt Again Beach Resort, brings to life his vision of a coastal haven where guests can escape urban hustle and reconnect with nature and culture. Lui's roots run deep in the Central Province, specifically the Rigo district, and it's on the shores of his village that his dream takes shape. With a passion for hospitality and a desire to showcase his heritage, Lui embarked on the journey of building Belt Again Beach Resort in 2023. The resort takes its name from the land it is built on, 'Kwari wai' in the native dialect, which means Belt Again. Now, a year and two months into construction, the resort stands as a beacon of local pride and opportunity. Employing local villagers in various roles, from carpenters, electricians, plumbers, security guards, drivers to chefs, Lui not only fosters economic growth but also preserves traditional craftsmanship and culinary practices.  Esau Lui in an interview with PNG Business News confirmed his employees where qualify in their respective professions delivering their services accordingly, “I told them, if we can build resources for other people, why not come together and we build for ourselves.” He added. He stated the importance of exposing such locations as tourist destinations, to the international community and the country as a whole. The resort's commitment to sourcing produce from nearby villages not only supports local economies but also enriches guests' dining experiences with authentic flavors. As the resort nears completion, its offerings promise an escape like no other. From comfortable accommodations to beachfront bungalows, and from tantalizing dining options to a plethora of activities, Belt Again Beach Resort plans to cater for guests’ preferences. Whether guests seek relaxation or cultural immersion or simply a moment of tranquility, the resort aims to deliver. Central to the resort's allure is its stunning jetty, stretching 210 meters from the rooms to the sea-view bar. By day, it offers a scenic pathway to the open sea, while by night, it transforms into a captivating spectacle, illuminated against the darkened waters. Lui's aspirations extend beyond mere hospitality; he envisions Belt Again Beach Resort as a catalyst for community development and cultural exchange. By involving nearby villages in Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) sales and tourism initiatives, he hopes to foster sustainable growth and empower local communities, including villages stretching by the coastline of Central Province. With a team of 37 skilled workers from diverse backgrounds, Lui's dedication to his vision is evident. These individuals are not just employees but partners in realizing a shared dream of prosperity and pride. As the resort's opening draws near, Lui reflects on the journey that brought him here—a journey rooted in childhood memories and fueled by a determination to give back to his community. Belt Again Beach Resort stands as a testament to Lui's unwavering commitment and the rich history of its location. “This location is special to me, when I was a child, my parents will bring me here. We had our gardens nearby, our coconut tress too. Growing up, I had a vision; to do something in this place. Today what you see is the reality of what I dreamt of building years ago.” “To bring back something, as an aspiring leader, this resort creates employment opportunities for locals and nearby villagers as well.” “Imagine if we start having tourists, we can involve and have villages and communities to participate in SME sales here.”  He added. Beyond its idyllic setting lies a legacy century in the making. Once a vital stop for seafaring travelers, Kwariwai Beach Point now emerges as a modern-day sanctuary, welcoming visitors and guests from near and far to experience its beauty and local hospitality. As the finishing touches are put in place, Belt Again Beach Resort awaits its grand unveiling for the months to come. Esau’s efforts shine through the well-built tropical escape taking shape.
June 10, 2024
Galomarubu village, along the Rigo coast nestled in the Rigo District of Central Province, lies an estimated 113 kilometers from bustling Port Moresby. Here, Esau Lui, the Owner and Director of Belt Again Beach Resort, brings to life his vision of a coastal haven where guests can escape urban hustle and reconnect with nature and culture. Lui's roots run deep in the Central Province, specifically the Rigo district, and it's on the shores of his village that his dream takes shape. With a passion for hospitality and a desire to showcase his heritage, Lui embarked on the journey of building Belt Again Beach Resort in 2023. The resort takes its name from the land it is built on, 'Kwari wai' in the native dialect, which means Belt Again. Now, a year and two months into construction, the resort stands as a beacon of local pride and opportunity. Employing local villagers in various roles, from carpenters, electricians, plumbers, security guards, drivers to chefs, Lui not only fosters economic growth but also preserves traditional craftsmanship and culinary practices.  Esau Lui in an interview with PNG Business News confirmed his employees where qualify in their respective professions delivering their services accordingly, “I told them, if we can build resources for other people, why not come together and we build for ourselves.” He added. He stated the importance of exposing such locations as tourist destinations, to the international community and the country as a whole. The resort's commitment to sourcing produce from nearby villages not only supports local economies but also enriches guests' dining experiences with authentic flavors. As the resort nears completion, its offerings promise an escape like no other. From comfortable accommodations to beachfront bungalows, and from tantalizing dining options to a plethora of activities, Belt Again Beach Resort plans to cater for guests’ preferences. Whether guests seek relaxation or cultural immersion or simply a moment of tranquility, the resort aims to deliver. Central to the resort's allure is its stunning jetty, stretching 210 meters from the rooms to the sea-view bar. By day, it offers a scenic pathway to the open sea, while by night, it transforms into a captivating spectacle, illuminated against the darkened waters. Lui's aspirations extend beyond mere hospitality; he envisions Belt Again Beach Resort as a catalyst for community development and cultural exchange. By involving nearby villages in Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) sales and tourism initiatives, he hopes to foster sustainable growth and empower local communities, including villages stretching by the coastline of Central Province. With a team of 37 skilled workers from diverse backgrounds, Lui's dedication to his vision is evident. These individuals are not just employees but partners in realizing a shared dream of prosperity and pride. As the resort's opening draws near, Lui reflects on the journey that brought him here—a journey rooted in childhood memories and fueled by a determination to give back to his community. Belt Again Beach Resort stands as a testament to Lui's unwavering commitment and the rich history of its location. “This location is special to me, when I was a child, my parents will bring me here. We had our gardens nearby, our coconut tress too. Growing up, I had a vision; to do something in this place. Today what you see is the reality of what I dreamt of building years ago.” “To bring back something, as an aspiring leader, this resort creates employment opportunities for locals and nearby villagers as well.” “Imagine if we start having tourists, we can involve and have villages and communities to participate in SME sales here.”  He added. Beyond its idyllic setting lies a legacy century in the making. Once a vital stop for seafaring travelers, Kwariwai Beach Point now emerges as a modern-day sanctuary, welcoming visitors and guests from near and far to experience its beauty and local hospitality. As the finishing touches are put in place, Belt Again Beach Resort awaits its grand unveiling for the months to come. Esau’s efforts shine through the well-built tropical escape taking shape.
June 10, 2024
Commentary by: Michael McWalter Michael McWalter explains the important responsibility to care for the vast amount of petroleum data submitted to the Government by operating petroleum companies and for the need for the establishment of a National Petroleum Data Centre in Papua New Guinea to cater for the vast amount of information arising from petroleum operations. The upstream petroleum industry is a recognised leader in the use of modern technology and has been ever since its foundation, always seeking new and innovative ways to locate the sites of new wildcat exploration wells which may probe the subterranean depths for hitherto undiscovered petroleum accumulations. This is no easy task as most of the easy to recognise prospects have been drilled already, and if they did contain commercial volumes of petroleum that could be extracted, they are by now largely exhausted and depleted of those reserves.  Modern day exploration does not simply seek to drill on dome-like hills to shallow targets next to surface oil seeps as was the modus operandi of Captain Drake at Spindletop in 1859 and his successors. Rather, the industry intelligently probes deep into the ground where the fundamentals of local geology are conducive to the generation of petroleum, its migration from a carbon-rich source and its accumulation in a porous reservoir within a confining geological structure out of which it cannot buoyantly spill to surface due to an impervious seal or cap rock. It is a high-tech data intensive business. Seismic Data This probing is most often done using the technique of reflection seismic surveys, much like the familiar echo-sounder used in a hospital image laboratory. Sound waves are directed into the subsurface in intensity and abundance and the many reflections of those sounds from changes in the properties of the rocks (typically, impedance, which is the product of the density of the rock and the velocity of sound in the rock) are equally recorded in abundance. These impedance contrasts often represent changes in rock strata – the beds of rock from sediments that have been thickly deposited in the Earth’s deep sedimentary basins.  The technique is employed both on land and at sea.  On land, a seismic line of sound sources and receivers are installed at regular intervals and shifted slowly forward after each shock; at sea, a boat trails a long streamer of receivers which are tugged behind it as a sound source is triggered at regular intervals in the voyage.    Figure 1: From a firing point, an explosive source create seismic waves that travel down through the rock strata where they bounce of boundaries between different rock types and reflect back to surface to be detected by receivers called geophones. (After Mau and Edmundson in Exploring for Oil and Gas, 2014)    With multiple sound sources bouncing off multiple layers of rock to multiple receivers – geophones (essentially strong microphones), a plethora of data is collected. When suitably corrected for varying elevation, geometry, signal-to-noise ratios, correlated, and compiled, a representation of the geometry of the subterranean strata and their structural configuration can be shown.  This is compiled in time-sections based on the two-way time for the sound waves to penetrate to and reflect from the depths. To gain more geological reality, these time-sections have to be converted into depth sections using the best estimates of the velocity of sound in each and every stratum penetrated. This is no mean feat and all manner of algorithms have been created to squeeze out the best seismic images that are the nearest to geological reality as possible. Added to this, seismic surveys may now be conducted not just with straight survey lines, but in 3-D arrays that provide a coherent tie of the data across the entire area of the survey; this necessarily multiplies the amount of data recorded and enables better seismic interpretation of the subsurface.   The seismic data of modern exploration is recorded and endlessly re-processed with ever more finesse of the geophysicist.  Old data may be re-processed with modern techniques bringing out more features hitherto undiscerned from prior processing and interpretation. Old data is not simply obsolete, it is extremely valuable. It not only helps new surveys home in on geological leads and prospects, but provides the basic architecture and understanding of the petroleum basin in which one is exploring.  Reprocessed seismic data may be added to new seismic data to save significant exploration costs. It thus has to be cared for and maintained in a readable format to enable the petroleum exploration of the future.  Moreover, aside from being valuable to the petroleum industry, this vast volume of data about the subterranean geology has many other uses in modern society ranging from helping with earthquake awareness, building codes, land stability studies and more. If the data is lost, the only way to recoup it is to conduct the surveys afresh, which is unlikely without the commercial impetus to explore for oil and gas. Other Surveys Added, to seismic data is the data derived from other types of geophysical surveys.  Years ago, intrepid geologists and explorers took with them delicate geophysical equipment to measure the strength of gravity and the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field as they traversed the land in geological surveys.   A major geological basin filled with less dense sedimentary rocks may reduce the local strength of gravity by about one ten thousandth of its normal value, whilst topographic effects may reduce the strength of gravity by a similar amount for every 400-500 metres of elevation (the gravity at the top of Mount Everest is about 0.2 % less than at sea level).  These were very difficult measurements to make, but as with everything, technology has taken over and airborne gravity and even satellite gravity data is now available. So sensitive are these measurements that geophysicists usually work in units of a milliGal (0.001 Gal) where 1 Gal is an acceleration of 1 cm/sec2 as compared to the average  force of gravity of 981 cm/sec2. Figure 2: Variation of the relative surface variation of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration gravity over different geological features    Magnetic surveys measure the variations in magnetic intensity.  Because igneous basement rocks usually contain more magnetically susceptible iron-bearing minerals, when uplifted or nearer to the surface, they give positive magnetic anomalies which may suggest that the basement of a basin lies nearer to the surface, or indeed that a basin does not actually exist! Again, technology has taken over and aeromagnetic data acquisition is commonly used not only to determine the architecture of a potential sedimentary basin, but to reveal other structural features within it. Figure 3: Example of aeromagnetic anomaly over ferromagnetic igneous dyke. (After Fugro Airborne Survey)    Both airborne gravity and magnetic data are nowadays routinely collected as they are cheaper than seismic data acquisition.  They have evolved to the point where such work is integral in the early stages of basin exploration, frequently preceding and guiding the acquisition of seismic data. The speed and uniformity of coverage, plus the relatively low cost of airborne surveys, have consolidated their role. Petroleum Geology Of course, basic geological surveys have fundamental importance, but by their nature, they are only carried out onshore on landmasses where rock outcrops are assessed. That assessment is for the nature of the rocks, their relationship to one another, the structural configuration of the rocks (generally, their dip and orientation), and features of the rock: like fossils; minerals, bedding, jointing, fractures, and veins.  This is basic geology which may or may not reveal the presence of a sedimentary basin and the important ingredients for the preservation of oil and gas accumulations.  A petroleum geologist is always keen to find geological evidence of source, migration, reservoir, trap and seal, and his first call will be for a geological map of the area of interest for exploration to provide evidence of such pre-requisites for the accumulation of oil and gas. Pre-requisites for a petroleum accumulation a source rock typically a dark shale with sufficient organic content that when buried and heated will generate petroleum evidence of the movement and migration of generated petroleum from source rocks through rock strata, that may then be caught in a reservoir, rather than be leaked to the surface reservoir rock that has not only sufficient porosity (space between its grains) to contain petroleum, but adequate connection between the pore spaces to permit that petroleum to flow a closure or trap made by a configuration of rock strata that either through folding, faulting or pinch-out define a structure within which petroleum may accumulate containment or seal of the structure by a barrier to the flow of petroleum, created by impermeable rocks and structures which prevent further upward buoyant movement of petroleum. Figure 4: Petroleum accumulation fundamentals. (After Magoon and Dow in The Petroleum System – From Source to Trap, AAPG 1994) This process of elucidating the subsurface to determine prospects where there is a chance of finding petroleum accumulations involves the gathering of enormous amounts of data about our Earth. Such knowledge is only gained at great expense and is therefore valuable data that needs to be preserved for future petroleum industry use and general public use. Drilling With the massive extent of offshore exploration worldwide, the preponderance of petroleum exploration data these days is seismic data, but this is only the start. The hypotheses of the geologist and the geophysicist have to be tested by that most famous “rotary lie-detector” more properly called the drilling bit. Wells have to be drilled to physically identify whether there is indeed an accumulation deep in subterranean depths and whether there is a reservoir in a trapping structure with an impervious seal and whether that reservoir contains an accumulation is just water, or perhaps oil and/or gas generated and migrated into it. The process of drilling a wildcat petroleum exploration well is akin to making a movie.  It is capitally intensive and budgets can get rapidly out of control.  In reality, commercial wildcat exploration success rates worldwide range from 30% to 40%. This is achieved through very careful prospect definition based on screening the chance of all the necessary ingredients being present in a prospect in the right timing.  We must recognise that recoverable oil and gas represents just 6% of the total hydrocarbon fluids generated.  Some 65% remains un-expelled from the strata in which it was generated and is now the subject of intense exploitation in the continental USA – as shale gas and shale oil plays.  Of the 35% that does get expelled, 10% is retained in the carrier, 8% is leaked naturally (as gas and oil seeps), 7% is spilled and bypassed, and 4% is not recoverable. But like movie hits amongst a litany of ordinary movies, there are a few blockbusters that can change the fate of a company and even nations on occasions. It is an industry which employs all skills to do as best it can. Figure 5: Petroleum generation and efficiency (After Nahum Schneidermann, Circum-Pacific Council 2006)   The drilling of a well can cost many millions of US dollars. Whilst it may costs just US$ 2 to 4 million for a simple well onshore in the USA, mid-size companies like ENI and Equinor quote figures of US$ 5 million to US$ 10 per well, but some wells in Papua New Guinea and other remote frontier areas of the world cost of the order of US$ 100 million each. With such large stakes, it is certainly expedient to manage the exploration data that leads up to the decision to drill most carefully and then to gather as much information as possible during the drilling process to make sure that no hydrocarbons are missed or overlooked, to optimise production in the case of success and to optimise future efforts based on the new knowledge gained. Logs The process of drilling reveals the nature of the subterranean sediments sequentially as the drilling bit works its way through the strata. Geologists sample and examine the cuttings of rock brought to the surface by the thick viscous drilling mud describing the penetrated rock and looking for signs of oil stain on the cuttings.  The drilling mud as it emerges from the hole is whisked to release any entrained gases which are then analysed in a gas chromatograph to determine their type (typically, paraffins or alkanes ranging from methane to pentane). If any signs of oil or hydrocarbon gas are found they are called shows. Special gas detectors examine the drilling mud for noxious gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, the latter of which is deadly poisonous. Aside from such step-by-step description of the rocks, potential hydrocarbons, and gaseous contaminants, other specific features of the rock may be examined such as density of any shales and the calcimetry of carbonates to distinguish limestone from dolomite.  Added to this, many drilling parameters are measured to help optimise the progress of drilling and to identify zone of over pressure in the rock. Masses of data are thus collected and collated in well logs that describe the geology that the well penetrates.  Figure 6: Example of part of a mud log (after SLB - The Defining Series: Mud Logging, 2015)   After a section of hole has been drilled, it is logged with special electrical tools that are lowered into the well bore on a strong electrical cable called a wireline. A detailed analytical record of the geology penetrated by a borehole is made recording the petrophysical properties of the strata using a variety of sensors. These measure the natural gamma ray, electrical, acoustic, stimulated radioactive responses, electromagnetic, nuclear magnetic resonance, pressure and other properties of the rocks and their contained fluids. The data itself is recorded and then printed as a well log showing the measured parameters by depth in the well. Figure 7: Simplified characteristic response of gamma Ray, resistivity and density logging tools over a sandstone reservoir filled with gas, oil and brine. (After Oil Field Review, Schlumberger, Spring 2011)     The logs of the geology and hydrocarbon shows of the well are analysed together with the physical parameters of the rocks as determined from the wireline logs to deduce the likelihood of there being moveable hydrocarbons within any porosity at the different levels of the well. If there are coherent signs of there being any reservoirs containing hydrocarbon, then well testing may be undertaken to test if these fluid will actually flow to the surface naturally.  Again, as a well is tested vast amounts of data are recorded of the type of fluids produced, their quantity and quality, the surface and subsurface pressures during flow and whilst the well is closed, Such data will help in making estimates of the size, shape, and quality of the oil and/or gas reservoir, as well as optimise the future production and recovery strategies. Figure 8: Complex plots of well testing data (here Elapsed Time of Test and Pressure Change and Derivative) enable petroleum engineers to gain valuable information about the reservoir and its accumulation of petroleum. (After US Dept. of Energy, Hydro, 2009)     Whilst this sequence of exploration produces lots of interesting data for the exploration company contracted to or licensed by the host government State, it must be realised it is all collected with the aim of identifying as big an accumulation of oil and/or gas as possible from which commercial production may be undertaken.  Whilst a proper academic understanding of the subsurface geology is necessary to optimise the finding of hydrocarbons, it is only a precursor to production and subsequent sale of the produced oil and gas for value. The international oil companies will not be so interested in the samples and data collected from well once the accumulation has been satisfactorily produced, other than to possibly revisit the field and its wells at some later date if economic circumstances make any remaining oil and gas left in the reservoir commercially viable to produce again. The samples and data will have value for future nearby prospecting as they will help elaborate the local and regional geology. However, oil companies wax and wane in their interest over a given area depending on the range of international opportunities that they have for investment.  A large discovery in a faraway country may distract an emerging exploration programme that might be on the cusp of success at home. Priorities might be to produce what has been discovered rather than look for more accumulations.  The steadfast entities behind all of this are the host government petroleum industry regulators who are only involved with the petroleum potential and outcome of exploration and production in their own jurisdiction. Figure 9: The commercial side of the petroleum business is an endless wrangle between host Government and the investing petroleum companies. (After Ashkay Jain in When Oil Companies Government Reach Agreement, 2021)   Role of the Government Petroleum Regulator in Respect of Data It is a fundamental role of the host government petroleum industry regulator to take care of the data. In all jurisdictions, the exploring companies must lodge copies of all the data that they acquire in the course of their endeavours with the host government petroleum industry regulators. After all the resources are owned by the people of the Nation and the knowledge that the petroleum exploration data reveals has been obtained at vast expense which would not be made were it not for the lure of potential petroleum accumulations and the possibility of their production at scale making extraordinary revenues for the companies and their host Government alike. Aside from the many task of the government petroleum regulator the care of historic and legacy petroleum data is vital. If all else fails in the administration and regulation of the petroleum industry and its exploration activities, the data acquired from such work must be collated, protected and cared for. It has lasting value to ongoing investment in the petroleum industry and to all other uses of geological data ranging from mineral exploration to geo-hazard awareness to road and other infrastructure development to building codes.  The data is quite essentially part of the patrimony of the Nation.    PNG Petroleum Data The PNG Government’s petroleum data is stored by the Petroleum Division of the Department of Petroleum’s archives and dates back to the early 1920s. The archive contains the results of all exploration endeavours for the discovery of oil and gas to date. As said, this information is the product of immense investment over time and has to be looked after. The Petroleum Division has indeed attempted to care for this data and has from time to time launched initiatives to improve its data storage and management, but it remains a daunting task notwithstanding the overture of various seismic companies and data specialist companies to help. Considering the enormous value of the petroleum resources that have been and continue to be extracted and exported, far too little attention has been paid to this aspect of the overall business. Given the physical extent of the current Petroleum Division archive, not enough financial and human resources are devoted to its maintenance, and there is an urgent need to bring the management of the PNG petroleum archive held at the Petroleum Division up to current standards. Bilateral, multilateral or even corporate funding could be solicited to help in this process as often occurs around the world. To date, it is estimated that only around 350 wells have been drilled in the course of exploration work by the oil and gas companies. These wells were based on hundreds of geological field surveys, magnetic and gravity surveys (potential field surveys) and equally hundreds of seismic surveys both onshore and offshore. In 2006, it was estimated that the Petroleum Division Archives held at last 65,000 records.  One would anticipate that this figure has now risen to around 75,000 records. In recent years, digital submission in addition to hard copy submission has been encouraged by the Petroleum Division on CD ROMs and in the case of geophysical data on Exabyte or similar tapes. The immediate problem is straightforward and that is the housing of these records in a controlled environment safe from weather, pests and interference. The author’s own home library with some 4,000 books, papers, files and manuscripts occupies 68 metres of shelf space, so an archive consisting of 75,000 records implies a need of at least 1,275 shelf metres, just to accommodate the primary existing documentation and records. Tapes and other digital media also need constant attention to prevent data deterioration as much a printed paper media. Figure 11: The Petroleum Division has recently relocated it archives to its new building in Waigani as a first step toward better data management.  Depicted above is Senior Archives Officer, Mr Kila Kila Navu, who has spent most of this life working at the Petroleum Division. (Source: Petroleum Division).    The Data Challenge The ultimate challenge would be to transcribe the entirety of the Petroleum Division archive to permanent memory either to high volume hard disks which can now hold as much as 20 Tera Byte (TB) or to Solid State Drives (SSDs) that can now hold as much as 100 TB. The capacity of data storage devices seems to increase year by year.  Fifteen year ago a disk drive that could hold 5TB seemed to be an impossible large. The new 100 TB SSDs are quoted at about US$ 40,000 each.  Just ten of them would represent 1Peta Byte (PB) perhaps enough to hold the complete PNG Petroleum Division archive including all seismic and other geological and geophysical data plus all drilling and production data.  The quantum of basic storage costs therefore seems to be about US$ 400,000.  That is not the only cost though as there also have to be systems that can support and operate these data storage devices and enable data to be deposited and retrieved.  Back-up systems, data acquisition and preparation drives, scanners to prepare printed media documentation for digitalisation, network access, and maintenance and training all have to be considered. All of this has to be housed in a high integrity building free from ambient dangers with a highly-controlled environment secure from all threats, and its own systems of reliable power supply, and alas an uninterruptible energy source to maintain that reliable supply. A period of controlled transition during which training would take place would have to maintain the old tradition (paper, tape and CD-ROM) archive alongside the new electronic archive.   One might conjecture the total costs to be of the order to US$ 10 million based on estimates made some fifteen years ago for the Ghana National Petroleum Commission of a West African State and allowing for inflation and some component reductions in price.  When LNG has been selling from the PNG LNG project at an average of US$ 12.82 per million British Thermal Units (MMBTU), and a LNG carrier tanker, such as the MV Papuan, which has a LNG capacity of 171,800 cubic metres, leaves the PNG LNG terminal every three to four days, it is estimated that each exported LNG cargo may be worth up to US$ 80 million, and there are approximately 100 such cargoes per year.  The cost of establishing a National Petroleum Data Centre is thus 0.125% of the gross revenue of LNG sales. If we conjecture a notional price of US$ 30 million per well as the cost of re-drilling some 350 historic wells, we can readily reach a price tag of US$ 10 billion for this information. It is not trivial amount and, indeed the value of the accumulated archive is indeed a National treasure that needs to be looked after well. This then is a call for the establishment of a National Petroleum Data Centre where not only can the petroleum data be preserved, but it can be made available to the petroleum industry in its future endeavour and other users so that this data serves the people of PNG.   Michael McWalter is a former Director, Petroleum Division and a former Adviser to the Government of Papua New Guinea and has erstwhile been petroleum adviser to the Governments of Ghana, Liberia, Cambodia, Sao Tome, Seychelles and South Sudan.
June 07, 2024
Santos was glad to have celebrated World Environment Day in the communities in accordance with this year’s World Environment Day theme: ‘Land Restoration, Desertification, and Drought Resilience’. In Port Moresby, staff joined forces for an early morning cleanathon at the popular Ela Beach to collect debris along the beach front. Representatives of the Santos PNG Environment team including Environment Manager Maxwell Haro visited a couple of schools together with the Santos Country Chair, PNG Leon Buskens, to speak to students about the importance of World Environment Day (WED) and why observing WED is important when it comes to preserving and protecting our environment. The two schools visited were June Valley Primary School, with more than 1600 students and 30 teachers, and Hohola Demonstration Primary School which had 2000 students and more than 33 teachers. A total of 100 tree seedlings were donated, 50 trees to each school, to support a tree planting activity commemorating WED. The message to the students at June Valley Primary was about planting a tree for WED, and a seedling in the hearts of the students for the future. Mr Haro said it was important for the Company to demonstrate its commitment to nature-based solutions while Mr Buskens reminded the students on the importance of trees and the role it plays in the ecosystem. “Trees serve as an important function in ecosystems, helping to sustain biodiversity and environmental balance. They provide oxygen, carbon storage, soil erosion prevention, water cycle regulation, and habitat for a diverse range of plant and animal species. Trees have a huge impact on climate regulation because they absorb carbon dioxide, reducing the greenhouse effect,” Buskens said. “We are pleased as a responsible organisation to be part of this important cause and in observing an important annual event throughout our operations in PNG. He also emphasised the Santos purpose of providing reliable and affordable energy to help create a better world for everyone. “We’ve already planted more than four million trees at our Markham Valley Afforestation and Reforestation Project in Morobe Province.” Land restoration is an integral part of the Santos Management System and Environment Management Plans in the PNG Operations. Rehabilitation and bioremediation programs are integral to achieving outcomes that align with restoration goals and objectives. Santos implements a comprehensive environment monitoring program that mitigates land degradation. Santos maintains compliance by proactively engaging with the Conservation Environment Protection Authority (CEPA) on all site closure and rehabilitation matters. Drought resilience programs have been rolled out throughout the Gulf and Southern Highlands, through the Community Affairs Sustainability program. To commemorate the day, activities scheduled throughout the Santos PNG operations included: Clean-a-thons, awareness, and tree planting activities at Hides, Kopi, Kutubu and Port Moresby Tree-planting at Gobe General awareness activities at the Kumul Marine Terminal, Gulf of Papua.
June 07, 2024
Santos was glad to have celebrated World Environment Day in the communities in accordance with this year’s World Environment Day theme: ‘Land Restoration, Desertification, and Drought Resilience’. In Port Moresby, staff joined forces for an early morning cleanathon at the popular Ela Beach to collect debris along the beach front. Representatives of the Santos PNG Environment team including Environment Manager Maxwell Haro visited a couple of schools together with the Santos Country Chair, PNG Leon Buskens, to speak to students about the importance of World Environment Day (WED) and why observing WED is important when it comes to preserving and protecting our environment. The two schools visited were June Valley Primary School, with more than 1600 students and 30 teachers, and Hohola Demonstration Primary School which had 2000 students and more than 33 teachers. A total of 100 tree seedlings were donated, 50 trees to each school, to support a tree planting activity commemorating WED. The message to the students at June Valley Primary was about planting a tree for WED, and a seedling in the hearts of the students for the future. Mr Haro said it was important for the Company to demonstrate its commitment to nature-based solutions while Mr Buskens reminded the students on the importance of trees and the role it plays in the ecosystem. “Trees serve as an important function in ecosystems, helping to sustain biodiversity and environmental balance. They provide oxygen, carbon storage, soil erosion prevention, water cycle regulation, and habitat for a diverse range of plant and animal species. Trees have a huge impact on climate regulation because they absorb carbon dioxide, reducing the greenhouse effect,” Buskens said. “We are pleased as a responsible organisation to be part of this important cause and in observing an important annual event throughout our operations in PNG. He also emphasised the Santos purpose of providing reliable and affordable energy to help create a better world for everyone. “We’ve already planted more than four million trees at our Markham Valley Afforestation and Reforestation Project in Morobe Province.” Land restoration is an integral part of the Santos Management System and Environment Management Plans in the PNG Operations. Rehabilitation and bioremediation programs are integral to achieving outcomes that align with restoration goals and objectives. Santos implements a comprehensive environment monitoring program that mitigates land degradation. Santos maintains compliance by proactively engaging with the Conservation Environment Protection Authority (CEPA) on all site closure and rehabilitation matters. Drought resilience programs have been rolled out throughout the Gulf and Southern Highlands, through the Community Affairs Sustainability program. To commemorate the day, activities scheduled throughout the Santos PNG operations included: Clean-a-thons, awareness, and tree planting activities at Hides, Kopi, Kutubu and Port Moresby Tree-planting at Gobe General awareness activities at the Kumul Marine Terminal, Gulf of Papua.
May 06, 2024
Ok Tedi Mining Limited (OTML) yesterday, presented a dummy cheque of K100,000.00 to the Mineral Resources Authority (MRA), to consolidate its position as a Major ‘Gold’ Sponsor of the MRA organized Geoscience, Exploration & Extraction (GEE) Conference 2024. The conference will be held on August 7-9, 2024, at the APEC Haus, Port Moresby. This is the second time that the MRA will be staging this two-yearly conference. The inaugural conference was held in 2022. OTML’s General Manager Social Performance and Sustainability, Mr. Jesse Pile, and Manager Corporate Affairs, Mr. Dexter Wagambie, presented the dummy cheque signifying the sponsorship, to the Patron of the GEE Conferences and Managing Director of the MRA, Mr. Jerry Garry. Mr. Garry when receiving the sponsorship, expressed the organising committee’s and the MRA’s gratitude towards OTML for its generous support to the event. He said that the contribution was very important in enabling the staging of the conference. Mr. Garry said the mining and the geoscience community in the country has not had a platform such as the GEE Conferences for the last two-three decades, where geoscience and engineering knowledge and ideas could be shared and discussed as learnings for the betterment of the industry as well as for the country. “We have people who are doing research work in Ok Tedi, in their laboratory to overcome recovery problems, or overcome metallurgical problems. There are people who are working in different parts such as Kainantu. They maybe looking at different ore types and there maybe new findings. But there is no medium in this country to share those new findings and foster growth within the scientific community, and GEE is now the appropriate avenue to do that.” The MRA MD appealed to other industry partners and stakeholders to support the conference. Mr Pile said OTML as a state-owned entity felt that it was only proper to be in the forefront of the conferences like this. He said this is because GEE would contribute towards the development of PNG in terms of research and human resources development. He said: “This contribution is building on from the very healthy relationship OTML has with MRA. From our observations, MRA is a leading organisation amongst other government authorities and agencies. The manner in which you run your organisation is professional, and Ok Tedi finds it fitting to work with your organisation, because of your professionalism. So this contribution is building on from what has been established over the years.” The GEE Conference aims to bring together leading academics, scientists, researchers and geoscientists, to share experiences and share research results in geological exploration and mineral extraction. It will provide a premier inter-disciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators, to present and discuss latest innovations, trends, concerns and practical solutions to challenges encountered throughout the business spectrum of the mining business. The conference will be the premier meeting place where stakeholders can connect and network with others in the field of geoscience, from learners to practitioners to decision makers. Presenters and participants will come from PNG and international based organizations as well as individuals, government agencies and Non-Government Organizations (NGOs).
May 06, 2024
Ok Tedi Mining Limited (OTML) yesterday, presented a dummy cheque of K100,000.00 to the Mineral Resources Authority (MRA), to consolidate its position as a Major ‘Gold’ Sponsor of the MRA organized Geoscience, Exploration & Extraction (GEE) Conference 2024. The conference will be held on August 7-9, 2024, at the APEC Haus, Port Moresby. This is the second time that the MRA will be staging this two-yearly conference. The inaugural conference was held in 2022. OTML’s General Manager Social Performance and Sustainability, Mr. Jesse Pile, and Manager Corporate Affairs, Mr. Dexter Wagambie, presented the dummy cheque signifying the sponsorship, to the Patron of the GEE Conferences and Managing Director of the MRA, Mr. Jerry Garry. Mr. Garry when receiving the sponsorship, expressed the organising committee’s and the MRA’s gratitude towards OTML for its generous support to the event. He said that the contribution was very important in enabling the staging of the conference. Mr. Garry said the mining and the geoscience community in the country has not had a platform such as the GEE Conferences for the last two-three decades, where geoscience and engineering knowledge and ideas could be shared and discussed as learnings for the betterment of the industry as well as for the country. “We have people who are doing research work in Ok Tedi, in their laboratory to overcome recovery problems, or overcome metallurgical problems. There are people who are working in different parts such as Kainantu. They maybe looking at different ore types and there maybe new findings. But there is no medium in this country to share those new findings and foster growth within the scientific community, and GEE is now the appropriate avenue to do that.” The MRA MD appealed to other industry partners and stakeholders to support the conference. Mr Pile said OTML as a state-owned entity felt that it was only proper to be in the forefront of the conferences like this. He said this is because GEE would contribute towards the development of PNG in terms of research and human resources development. He said: “This contribution is building on from the very healthy relationship OTML has with MRA. From our observations, MRA is a leading organisation amongst other government authorities and agencies. The manner in which you run your organisation is professional, and Ok Tedi finds it fitting to work with your organisation, because of your professionalism. So this contribution is building on from what has been established over the years.” The GEE Conference aims to bring together leading academics, scientists, researchers and geoscientists, to share experiences and share research results in geological exploration and mineral extraction. It will provide a premier inter-disciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators, to present and discuss latest innovations, trends, concerns and practical solutions to challenges encountered throughout the business spectrum of the mining business. The conference will be the premier meeting place where stakeholders can connect and network with others in the field of geoscience, from learners to practitioners to decision makers. Presenters and participants will come from PNG and international based organizations as well as individuals, government agencies and Non-Government Organizations (NGOs).

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