Agriculture

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 24, 2022

Agriculture Minister: Cocoa and Coffee Should be Exported Through Govt Organisation

Agriculture and Livestock Minister John Simon believes that coffee and cocoa should be exported through a government organisation. Simon stated the private sector could not continue to export and suppress prices in response to concerns from Pomio MP Elias Kapavore. “I have talked to the department (Agriculture and Livestock) and the commodity boards to look at this and we are planning to come up with a policy that the raw products should be exported by a state agency,” Simon said. “The raw products, especially parchment coffee, green bean coffee, cocoa beans should be exported by a state agency. “This is so that we can also get involved in the market, the department has not been involved in the market.” He said that the commodities boards were solely involved in extension programs and other services, not in the selling of the country's agricultural products. “I have been having meetings with our commodity boards to get involved in the market,” Simon said. “We need to in order to get the right price, the correct price to our farmers. “The world prices are very good, the world has opened up. “We know what the prices are and there is no reason why our farmers should continue to get less than K5 or K6 on parchment coffee and cocoa as well. “The prices are out there, the population of the world has grown and the demand for coffee, cocoa and a lot of our commodities is very good.” Simon encouraged coffee and cocoa growers to continue to grow as the commodities were doing well on the international market.   Reference: The National (20 January 2022. “A state agency should export coffee, cocoa: Minister”.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 21, 2022

Voco Point Has Potential To Transform PNG Fisheries

Photo credit: Post Courier  The recently opened Voco Point Coastal Fisheries Hub has the potential to transform PNG's fisheries growth. Fisheries Minister Dr Lino Tom and Morobe Governor Ginson Saonu recently opened the K105 million project in Lae. The National Fisheries Authority (NFA) intends to rebuild its land holdings and properties at Voco Point so that it may serve as a hub for fish landing, processing, and distribution. NFA managing director John Kasu stated during the launch that a facility would be built to facilitate large-scale fish distribution. “The Voco Point fisheries hub project will take coastal fisheries development to another level,” he stated. “The project aims to become a main commercial hub for fishing groups in Morobe and the neighboring provinces like Oro, Manus, East New Britain and West New Britain.” Buyers or retail stores, including catering companies, would be present at the facility to purchase the catch of fishing cooperatives and SMEs, according to Kasu. “I know many of you may be wondering why NFA did not develop this project earlier on,” he said. “The concept became possible when NFA purchased this portion of land, which used to be under Lutheran Shipping, and then was transferred to Nasfund. “So we purchased this piece of land and thereafter, we began to develop the concept of setting up this fisheries hub.” The project will comprise a waterfront facility for landing, unloading, and selling fresh fish, as well as a facility for receiving, processing, and distributing frozen fish. On the other side of the road, an NFA office building will be erected. “The fisheries hub will be commenced with the invitation of tenders by the end of this month or early February,” said Kasu. “Selections of contractors will take place in March or April, and we anticipate the construction of the facility to begin in April or May of 2022. “It’ll take 18 months to completion so we’re anticipating that by October of next year, this whole setup will be in place.”   Reference: Loop (17 January 2022). “K105m Fisheries Hub Launched”.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 21, 2022

Tate: Logging Industry “Depressed”

According to PNG Forestry Industry Association (PNGFIA) president Bob Tate, the country's logging industry is depressed, with nothing on the horizon in the short term to instil confidence in industry players. According to Tate, the logging business has been hurt by ongoing tax reforms as well as a drop in market demand. He claimed the sector was currently generating roughly 2.5 million cubic metres per year, down nearly 50% from just under four million cubic metres. “The Government has taxed it (logging industry) out of existence,” Tate said. “It’s no longer sustainable. “In Western, Gulf and West Sepik, all factories are shut. Thousands of people have lost their jobs. “Mills of various sizes open and close quite often depending on supply and demand and in round numbers probably 20 to 25 medium size mills are operating.” According to Tate, the country used to have around 40 mills running. “No long supply, no mills operating. “The biggest sawmills relied on having big logging operations, if logging becomes unsustainable, then there is no logs to put in the factories. “Then there is the problem of where to sell them. “We are on the receiving end of the collapse in demand in the world market. “The industry is looking terrible, it is depressed with nothing on the horizon in the short term to give any confidence to industry players. “We have been over the years asked the government for a taxation regime in the forest sector that restores sustainability in the long term, the tax rules change now and then and increasing. “The government is now getting roughly 55 to 60 per cent of the industry turnover that’s unsustainable and driving industry to collapse.”   Reference: Luma, Dale. The National (14 January 2022). “Logging industry ‘depressed’

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 17, 2022

Vanilla Is The Most Popular Spice In The Country

Photo credit: Slofoodgroup In terms of production volume, vanilla is the most popular spice in the country, with 520,000 kg produced annually. In terms of market trends, the price of vanilla would rise by 5% in the next five years, according to PNG Spice Industry Board chief executive officer Nelson Simbiken. “In terms of production and volume, vanilla is a lot more than other spices such as cardamom, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, pepper, citronella and nutmeg. “In terms of the demand, for specific spices like vanilla, new countries are consuming vanilla as part of their beverages and ice cream.” Simbiken said demand from China and Brazil was increasing. “East Sepik and West Sepik are the leading vanilla producers in the country,” he said. “The vanilla town of the country right now is Maprik. That is the major trade centre where vanilla is brought from all over the country. “Most of the buyers are from Maprik. “They travel to other provinces and buy, bring it back and start trading within Maprik and eventually they pack them there and export it. “For vanilla, one kilogram with good quality and the current local price is K200, K270 or K300 per kg. “That’s big money.”   Reference: The National (11 January 2022). “Vanilla leads in spice production”. 

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 17, 2022

Spice Industry Exports Over K1.3bil of Product in Last Four Years

According to Spice Sector Board Chief Executive Officer Nelson Simbiken, the country's spice industry has exported K1.3 billion worth of products in the last four years. According to Simbiken, K400 million worth of items were shipped in 2021, much above the norm of over K300 million. “From 2019 to now, revenue from export we have from Customs and National Agriculture and Quarantine Inspection Authority ( (showed that) the industry has exported K1.3 billion,” he said. “On an annual basis, spice industry has been exporting over K300 million on an annual basis. “In 2019, the spice industry exported over K500 million, in 2020 K600 million, in 2021 over K400 million,” Simbiken said the spice industry was picking up after being slow for some years. “At the moment, it's dead,” he said. “We are resurrecting it to make it grow. The significance of that is that with one kilogram of spice, you’ll get 100 times the value in terms of money than the similar amount of commodities like cocoa and coffee. “For example one kilogramme of coffee, raw beans, you get K7, or, for parchment, it’s about K4. “For cocoa, one kilogramme is about K6 to K7. But for spice, the raw product, especially vanilla, with one kilogram is about K200. “So most of the farmers for other crops work hard to get 60kg of cocoa bean and wait for transport to bring it to town. But for vanilla, you get about 10kg, put them in your bag and come in and get higher value compared other commodities.”   Reference: The National (11 January 2022). “Spice board: K1.3bil worth of product exported in last 4 years”. According to Spice Sector Board Chief Executive Officer Nelson Simbiken, the country's spice industry has exported K1.3 billion worth of products in the last four years. According to Simbiken, K400 million worth of items were shipped in 2021, much above the norm of over K300 million. “From 2019 to now, revenue from export we have from Customs and National Agriculture and Quarantine Inspection Authority ( (showed that) the industry has exported K1.3 billion,” he said. “On an annual basis, spice industry has been exporting over K300 million on an annual basis. “In 2019, the spice industry exported over K500 million, in 2020 K600 million, in 2021 over K400 million,” Simbiken said the spice industry was picking up after being slow for some years. “At the moment, it's dead,” he said. “We are resurrecting it to make it grow. The significance of that is that with one kilogram of spice, you’ll get 100 times the value in terms of money than the similar amount of commodities like cocoa and coffee. “For example one kilogramme of coffee, raw beans, you get K7, or, for parchment, it’s about K4. “For cocoa, one kilogramme is about K6 to K7. But for spice, the raw product, especially vanilla, with one kilogram is about K200. “So most of the farmers for other crops work hard to get 60kg of cocoa bean and wait for transport to bring it to town. But for vanilla, you get about 10kg, put them in your bag and come in and get higher value compared other commodities.”   Reference: The National (11 January 2022). “Spice board: K1.3bil worth of product exported in last 4 years”.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - January 04, 2022

ADB, ECOM Sign Loan to Support Livelihoods, Boost Climate Resilience of Smallholder Farmers

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and ECOM Agroindustrial Corp. Limited (ECOM) signed a loan of up to $60 million to help sustain the livelihoods of smallholder farmers amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and improve their ability to withstand the impacts of climate change. The loan will support ECOM’s continued operations in India, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and Viet Nam by financing inventories of coffee and cacao procured from more than 27,800 smallholder farmers. It will also fund advance payments and extension services to farmers to provide liquidity and support to these farmers and reduce the impacts on their business from the disruptions to agricultural value chains caused by the pandemic. Extension services provided by ECOM focus on improving farmers’ capacity to adapt to climate change by introducing sustainable farming techniques, data solutions, and financial literacy. “Climate change and the ongoing pandemic are intensifying the pressure on smallholder farmers in Asia and the Pacific. COVID-19 has reduced their incomes and made it more difficult for them to invest in climate-resilient measures,” said ADB Agribusiness Investment Unit Head Martin Lemoine. “Commercial banks are reducing their exposure to commodity players. ADB’s support for agricultural merchants like ECOM will help bridge this funding gap and ensure reliable income to farmers, enabling them to take steps to adapt to climate change.” An accompanying technical assistance grant will provide capacity building in climate-smart cocoa and coffee farming best practices and financial literacy in Indonesia and PNG, further supporting farmers’ recovery from the pandemic. The technical assistance will benefit about 4,000 farmers and also promote gender-inclusive practices. The grant comprises $205,000 from ADB’s Technical Assistance Special Fund for COVID recovery and $425,000 from the Strategic Climate Fund, administered by ADB.  The borrowers are ECOM Agroindustrial Corp. Limited (EACL), ECOM’s ultimate holding company incorporated in Switzerland, and ECOM Agroindustrial Asia Pte. Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of EACL, incorporated in Singapore. ECOM is the world's largest coffee miller and one of the world's top merchants of coffee, cocoa, and cotton. It works with over 800,000 farmers in 40 countries. As an integrated commodity originator, processor, and merchandiser, ECOM focuses on partnering with smallholder farmers to provide traceable and certified products to branded product manufacturers. ADB is committed to achieving a prosperous, inclusive, resilient, and sustainable Asia and the Pacific, while sustaining its efforts to eradicate extreme poverty. Established in 1966, it is owned by 68 members—49 from the region.

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Agriculture

PNG Business News - December 21, 2021

PM Marape says agriculture is ‘transformational’

The K140 million 12-story West New Britain Haus in Port Moresby, according to James Marape, demonstrates that agriculture is "transformational." He remarked this as he unveiled the West New Britain people's landmark emblem, which was supported by the province's lucrative oil palm sector. The Department of Justice and Attorney-General, as well as all of its agencies, will occupy all 12 floors. PM Marape stated the West New Britain narrative should serve as an example to every person and provincial government in the country, and that it was in keeping with Pangu Pati's vision of the country's economic independence. He praised Governor Sasindran Muthuvel, as well as previous and current officials, for having the foresight to wisely invest revenues from the province's oil palm business. “Today is a wonderful occasion, a testament and a reflection of something I believe in the core of my heart: Agriculture is transformational,” the Prime Minister told hundreds of people, mainly from West New Britain, who were there to celebrate. “Agriculture can make it happen for our people. “This is not oil or gas money, this is not gold money, this is not money from other sources, but money from agriculture. “Who says agriculture cannot transform our country? “Our nation is a nation of landowners. “This story today must inspire, if not individually, provincial governments throughout the length and breadth of our country. “Don’t sit back depending on Waigani. “You talk about power, you talk about autonomy, you talk about wanting more, well you must be an economic powerhouse. “You already have land, you already have people, you already have power: Mobilise them to ensure you transform your land, not just from oil palm, but coffee, copra, cocoa, rubber, vanilla, organic agriculture and everything else.” The establishment of West New Britain Haus, according to PM Marape, was a great example of agriculture revenue being transformative when leaders had the foresight “to think big, think deep, think into the future, think sustainable and are able to invest…not in political feel-good investments or politically-convenient investments in the face of election, but investing in something that will stand the test of time and bring in sustainable dividends for children of that province”. “West New Britain: I step back and say congratulations on the efforts of the leadership.”   Reference: PM James Marape News Page (12 December 2021). “PM Marape says agriculture is ‘transformational’”

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 26, 2021

Agriculture In Markham and Ramu Valleys Might Be Advantageous, Says IFC

Photo credit: The Christensen Fund - Markham Valley Agriculture development in the Markham and Ramu valleys of Papua New Guinea's Morobe Province, according to the International Finance Corporation, might result in significant economic advantages. The International Finance Corporation (IFC), which is part of the World Bank Group, has teamed together with Australian and New Zealand aid programs to create a strategy for the Markham/Ramu Agricultural Growth Corridor. This involves a development strategy and an investment strategy to boost agricultural growth. The IFC noted as PNG responds to the implications of Covid-19, the development of this corridor may promote exports and investment, local production and commerce, and employment. Simultaneously, it will improve food security. The agricultural transformation is a long-term undertaking, according to the report, but there are a number of actions that may be completed sooner. Animal protein, animal feed, fruit and vegetable production, and cocoa production are all examples. Nathan Ross, New Zealand's deputy high commissioner in PNG, said his nation has been assisting PNG's agriculture and energy sectors in order to help the country accomplish its economic growth goals. He stated that they have partnered with the IFC to build the agricultural growth corridor, recognizing that private sector-led growth is a major development objective.   Reference: RNZ (23 November 2021. “IFC promotes PNG agriculture”.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 26, 2021

Minister to Implement Downstream Processing for Forestry Industry

The government intended to implement downstream processing, according to Forestry Minister Walter Schnaubelt, with an emphasis on boosting forestry and plantation. Schnaubelt recently stated in West New Britain that as part of the government's plan to reclaim the forestry sector, investors would only be awarded 50% of export licences. “The new permits that we will be giving out will only be 50 per cent for export and the other half must be processed in the country,” Schnaubelt said. “There will be disgruntled developers because most of them would want 100 per cent export but under the agreement for a permit, it clearly stipulates that 20 per cent must be downstream processing. “As Forest Minister, I must make a contribution to this sector. “The buck stops with me.” Schnaubelt stated that he hoped to see a lot more downstream processing in the province. “We need investors who will come and work together with PNGFA to invest their capital in this country. This is just one of the initiatives that we are working on at the PNGFA head office but I will soon make announcements on these developments,” he said. According to Schnaubelt, downstream processing cannot be limited to sawn timber. “I want some time in the near future that papers and even toilet rolls must be produced in PNG.”   Reference: The National (19 November 2021). “Govt to cut log exports by 50pc”.

Agriculture

Marcelle P. Villegas - November 21, 2021

The Youth Leads Ecosystem Restoration through Mangrove Planting

Mangrove seedlings [Photo credit: Sarangib, from Pixabay] In celebration of World Environment Day last June, there were 600 school children who took part in planting 700 mangrove seeds along the coastline of Riwo, Madang Province. The celebration's theme for this year is "Ecosystem Restoration". The mangrove planting activity was made possible through the Child-Focus Disaster Risk Reduction (CFDRR) project. The project aims to bring awareness to children the importance of mangrove in protecting the environment along the coastlines. The roots of the mangroves sustain life in the aquatic ecosystem by providing safe shelter and breeding area for some species of fish. CFDRR is a key long-term strategy for sustainable and resilient development to ensure that the future generations can cope with climate change. CFDRR programs and projects are implemented in various countries and adopted by UNICEF as well. According to Dehaan Lapawe, project coordinator of CFDRR, "Mangrove trees in swampy or coastal areas provide a safe and rich habitat for different fish stocks to rest, feed, recover and breed. Fish bring protein and income for families."[1] Lapawe emphasised that matured mangrove trees also provide shelter for birds and other animals. Moreover, mangroves reduce the effect of waves from the body of water, therefore, preventing soil erosion. He also mentioned that mangrove seeds can also serve as a food source in some parts of Papua New Guinea. "This is one way to be disaster ready. The community must continue this initiative to reduce soil erosion and help protect their schools and community." The CFDRR project in Riwo village is a project of World Vision, in partnership with Madang Provincial Disaster office. It is funded by the Australian government through the Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AHP). With regards to the brewing effects of climate change, the study and research titled "Beyond Barriers: Integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in the Pacific" (July 2021) reports and verifies that climate change results in rising sea level. If this increase in sea level intensifies through time, it will cause other major environmental problems like soil erosion and further damages to the environment. “Beyond Barriers…” is a study and research by Jessica McCommon, Jessica Lees (Humanitarian Advisory Group), Cedric Hoebreck (World Vision Australia), and Linda Vaike (Independent Consultant).[2] According to Humanitarian Advisory Group, who featured the transcript of “Beyond Barriers” and described its findings and purpose, “The case for integrating disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) to minimise loss and damage, reduce vulnerability and enhance resilience continues to grow. This is against a backdrop of increasing frequency and severity of disasters worldwide and the recognition that, at the community level, the distinction between DRR and CCA is artificial.” “Linkages between the two policy fields, coming belatedly to communities’ holistic understandings of what is driving their exposure to risk and how to manage it, have driven researchers, policymakers and practitioners to consider how to more closely align approaches to produce better outcomes for crisis-affected populations.” “The case has been made in academic and practitioner literature, agency reports and emerging policies, yet what it means from a community perspective to integrate DRR and CCA has received little research attention.”[2]   To address the potential environmental damages of climate change in the future, this CFDRR project aims to prevent and counter climate change impacts "through climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction”. In this initiative, they chose to focus on children whom they consider “the most vulnerable”. [1]   According to Sixtus Balen, head teacher of Malmal Primary School, the initiative of CFDRR is "timely" because the rising sea level due to climate change and strong sea surges are inevitable forces of nature, and that the people in the community are vulnerable to those occurrences. He also mentioned smaller and low-lying islands are disappearing and now the mainland is exposed to destructive soil erosion.   Balen stated, "Mangrove trees in Riwo and Malmal swamps and coastal areas were cut and used by locals for building houses, fuel-wood, making canoes and other artefacts of cultural importance over time. Unfortunately, no replacement has been made."[1]   He also noted that mangroves are essential "as a buffer to protect the shoreline and [will provide] a breeding site for fish". Such knowledge on the mangrove’s importance might is new for most students. Thus, he thanked World Visions CFDRR project for this mangrove planting initiative which brought deeper environmental education and awareness for the youth.   From an article by Papua New Guinea Post-Courier, Madang Provincial Government's disaster manager, Rudolph Mongallee, expressed that "his office cannot perform as it should to counter the impacts of climate change and disaster preparedness within the province because of reasons beyond his control."[1]   He did mention that the ongoing partnership with World Vision is "peaceful and cordial" and he is very supportive of the initiative. Mongallee stated, "I'm only wishing that if World Vision can extend to the other six districts, because those districts that World Vision has already entered, I see that they're already disaster prepared."   The young students who took part in the mangrove planting also expressed their commitment to look after the mangrove seedling and appreciation that such initiative gave them a chance to directly look after their local marine ecosystem.   One of the students named Stephanie said, “Planting mangrove is important because it can protect us from rising sea levels and be a home for small fish to breed.” Another student, Benedict, said “I will look after my tree and my village and school.”   The future looks bright with the young generation taking an active part in addressing the adverse effects of climate change. All it takes are consistent and well-planned steps like this mangrove planting initiative which was organised by World Vision and other partners.       ----- Reference: [1] (20 Sept. 2021) Papua New Guinea Post-Courier website. "Children Plant Mangroves To Address Climate Change". Retrieved from - https://postcourier.com.pg/children-plant-mangroves-to-address-climate-change/ [2] McCommon, Jessica; Lees, Jessica; et al. (July 2021). “Beyond Barriers: Integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation int he Pacific" Retrieved from - https://humanitarianadvisorygroup.org/insight/beyond-barriers-integrating-disaster-risk-reduction-and-climate-change-adaptation-in-the-pacific/ Photo credit: Top photo - by sarangib, Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/photos/mangrove-seedlings-plantation-creek-249920/ [2] “Beyond Barriers: Integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation int he Pacific"  by McCommons, Lees, et al. -- Humanitarian Advisory Group - https://humanitarianadvisorygroup.org/insight/beyond-barriers-integrating-disaster-risk-reduction-and-climate-change-adaptation-in-the-pacific/

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 18, 2021

Marape: PNG Dedicated to Preserving Rainforests

PNG may be the smallest economy in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec), but it is rich in natural resources, according to Prime Minister James Marape. He virtually addressed the Apec economic leaders' summit, which was hosted by New Zealand. “Papua New Guinea, in our small way, commit ourselves to preserve 13 per cent of the world’s rainforests that we have. And we commit ourselves to preserving 6 per cent of the world’s biodiversity that we have.” Marape urged Apec leaders to be aware of PNG's global assets in light of climate change and mitigation issues and to assist the country in conservation. When PNG hosted the Apec meeting in 2018, he said, the majority of the Apec economies came to visit. “You would have realised that we live in the middle of east and west, we live in the middle of north and south,” he said. “We are the smallest economy, amid each and every one of you. But we are a voice – especially advocating for small (Pacific) island nations, the smaller nations, the weaker nations. We can be a pointer to you bigger economies on how to link to each and everyone, and help humanity.”   Reference: The National (15 November 2021). “PNG committed to preserve rainforest, PM tells Apec meeting”.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 18, 2021

NFA Secures Land For Tuna Terminal Project

Photo credit: National Fisheries Authority The National Fisheries Authority (NFA) has provided K5 million as a final transaction for the acquisition of property for a fisheries centre that was in the process of being liquidated. The site at Rabaul, East New Britain Province, has been obtained for a fisheries centre, on which the NFA has begun construction in collaboration with the East New Britain Provincial Association. In terms of the project's history, the property was sold to the highest bidder for K12 million, of which ENBPA paid K2 million, with the remaining K5 million coming from the Public Investment Program, which was supported by the Department of National Planning after NFA submitted a proposal. The NFA paid the remaining K5 million in a modest check on Thursday, November 11th, but full work will not begin until land titles in liquidation are in order, and a representative from O'Brian Lawyers was there to accept the check. According to John Kasu, NFA's Managing Director, this is one of the infrastructure projects the organization is working on around the nation as part of its 10-year strategic plan.  “This Rabaul Tuna Terminal is basically one of those important projects that we are embarking on and apart from that we have projects in Lae, we have the Voco Point and Wagang. Recently we have this PMIZ that has been brought back to NFA to implement,” he said. Mr Kasu said Rabaul is an important transhipment port and there are four right across the country from Rabaul, Lae, Madang and Wewak. Adding that Rabaul has activities, that NFA is getting on board to strengthen and develop those areas and its infrastructures.   “The Tuna Terminal is about developing our facility where all these activities are taking place off-shore and transhipment. Some these activities can be brought onshore, and that piece of land provides a wharf where vessels can come in and to carry out transhipment provisioning.” The NFA will continue to collaborate with the ENBPA, beginning with the creation of an MoU outlining what is required for future development on the bought land. Upon receiving the award,, ENB Deputy Provincial Administrator, Nicholas Larme,, said: “This one has taken a long time for us to find traction going forward. Ownership of land is important for project development, and is the counterpart of the equity that provinces will have in relation to moving this project forward.”   Reference: Loop (12 November 2021). “NFA Secures Land For Project”. 

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 08, 2021

Fisheries Exports Exceeded K1.5Bil Last Year, Says NFA

According to the National Fisheries Authority, the country's fish and fisheries goods exports exceeded K1.5 billion last year (NFA). This was said by managing director John Kasu during the beginning of the national fisheries judicial conference, which is now taking place in Port Moresby. “The importance of fisheries to Papua New Guinea and the economies of coastal and island communities cannot be understated,” he said. “The export of fish and fishery products out of PNG in terms of quantity has continued to increase annually over the last years. “Last year, the value of exports exceeded K1.5 billion for all fish and fishery products while from licensing, PNG earned close to K400 million.” More than 103,000 tons of fish and fisheries products were shipped to international markets in 2014, according to the authority's website. In 2019, exports nearly quadrupled to 196,000 tonnes of items, with a total export value of K1.3 billion, in only five years. Tuna in canned, frozen, and dry meal forms, dried sea cucumber (bêche-de-mer), finfish, prawn and shrimp, sharkfin, lobster, and crab were among the fish and fisheries exports. The combined exports from the coastal fisheries industry accounted for barely 1% of overall PNG fish and fishery exports. Tuna exports and total combined fish and fisheries exports were dominated by onshore-based tuna processing facilities and locally-based foreign vessels. The majority of canned tuna goods are sent to the European Union region, along with substantial amounts of frozen whole round tuna for resale or further processing, thanks to the European Union's tax-free agreement and ecolabelling certificate that Parties to the Nauru Agreement enjoy. Under a commercial deal agreed by the presidents of the Melanesian Spearhead Group countries, PNG canned tuna is also shipped to Fiji, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu.   Reference: The National (3 November 2021). “Exports surpass K1.5bil”. 

Agriculture

PNG Business News - November 05, 2021

MORI: PNG ADAMENT ON STOPPING LOGGING BY 2030

Photo credit: Lowy Institute The Papua New Guinea Special Envoy and Minister for Environment Conservation & Climate Change, Hon. Wera Mori, MP, says PNG is adamant on ceasing all logging, on a large scale, completely by 2030. He said the collective decision by COP26 to stop deforestation entirely by 2030, is an agenda PNG has always advocated for under the leadership of Prime Minister, Hon. James Marape, MP. “It is now a formal Government policy to ban round-logging by 2025 and ban logging entirely by 2030. “We didn’t know that this would be the position taken up by COP26, here in Glasgow. However, this is a blessing in disguise for Papua New Guinea. Over the years these COP summits have become exaggerated, where every year we collaborate and come up with ideologies to mitigate climate change; yet nothing practical is being done, in addressing global climate issues,” Minister Mori said. He said COP26 must change. It must not be a forum for talking and conceptualizing. It must move forward and walk the talk. “Papua New Guinea has decided to take action, simply because, our landmass covers one per cent of the global landmass, and is host to seven per cent of global biodiversity, in terms of marine and territorial landmass. “For us, it has been quite a challenge, simply because, despite the fact that we host 30 per cent of the remaining primary rainforest, we have become the lungs of this planet, drawing in carbon dioxide, emitted by industrialized countries. “That has been spelt out in our National Determined Contribution, which we submitted on 18th December 2020, having been one of the first few countries in the world to do so,” Minister Mori said. He said PNG now has all relevant enabling legislations to basically walk along that path. “The biggest question now is, monetization of our efforts – how do we get compensated? “We just simply can’t ban logging in PNG, as it is a $1 billion industry, where the industrialized world expects us to continue to be the carbon filters of the earth, when they are only good for talking but not being responsible for our climate predicaments,” Minister Mori said. He said Papua New Guinea is a member of the global community so when we decide to do that, we know what the costs are, having done our part. “We would like to see the industrialized world or the first world who are responsible for the emission of greenhouse gases, come up with financial and economic development assistance packages. “So, if the UN or the industrialized countries wanted us to terminate logging in our country entirely, they would have to make up for the revenue we raise from that particularly industry, annually,” Minister Mori said. He said for other members of the Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN), I will also advocate on their behalf. They too must be compensated. “It is completely unfair that we are the victims of the climate problems we have not caused,” Minister Mori said. He also had brief pull aside meetings with the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, and His Royal Highness Prince Charles, at the margins of the COP26 Leaders’ Summit, in Scotland.   Article courtesy of Department of PM&NEC

Agriculture

PNG Business News - October 13, 2021

Oil Palm Blocks Restoration will Provide Revenue: Official

Photo credit: Department of Agriculture and Livestock According to Oil Palm Industry Corporation (Opic) acting general-secretary Kepson Pupita, the rehabilitation of smallholder oil palm blocks would result in more money being earned. Pupita was recently in Alotau, Milne Bay, to gift Opic workers with a motorcycle and tour abandoned dwellings on project sites. Opic also compensated around 26 farmers who were hired to clean their blocks as part of the Opic initiative. “In 2019, in the Alotau project, we did 687,117 metric tonnes of fresh fruit bunch,” Pupita said. “In 2020, the time we started doing some intervention activities with the support of the government for the first time, our production went up to 733,724 metric tonnes. “That is a small increase of 7 per cent or 46,607 metric tonnes. “But in terms of kina, we brought in K65 million to the farmers – the gross earnings paid to the farmers.” The Alotau project, which comprises 1,522 hectares of cultivated oil palm, has around 843 smallholder farmers. “I continue to tell farmers that this increase in 60 per cent of world price will continue to spiral up thanks to the Coronavirus (Covid-19),” Pupita said. “In the local communities people continue to work, because they are already isolated, the families live on their own. “And that is the advantage of agriculture, and we will have to continue to promote agriculture.”   Reference: The National (11 October 2021). “Restoration of oil palm blocks will bring money: Official”. 

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