K7 Million In PNG Coffee Export Orders From UK

by PNG Business News - September 05, 2022

Photo: Keith Scott, the British High Commissioner to PNG

Small and medium-sized businesses have received export orders totaling more than K7 million (US$2 million) as a result of an ongoing commercial collaboration between the British and PNG governments.

Keith Scott, the British High Commissioner to PNG, made this statement in response to Prime Minister James Marape's appeal for investors to consider the agricultural industry.

He stated that he wants to advance direct business support that benefits the economy, jobs, and rural regions of Papua New Guinea.

According to Mr. Scott, there is a lot happening in the agricultural sector, as evidenced by the fact that coffee and New Britain Palm Oil's biggest export markets are Liverpool and the United Kingdom.

“That’s essentially what we are looking to expand and promote but we’re looking very much at the technical level assistance that feeds directly down to PNG producers,” Mr. Scott said.

“We did some work last year with Commonwealth and Standards Network helping PNG establish internationally recognised standards and again that will help facilitate trade. So we’re looking to help PNG and facilitate trade to the UK, Commonwealth, and beyond and hopefully meet a lot of the objectives that the Prime Minister set out.

“We’re looking for areas where the UK has specific expertise that can meet the needs of PNG.

“Forestry is a good example we have a market project on sustainable forestry which we are setting up in the next couple of weeks. Which is to do a study to help PNG Forest Authority look at how we commit better use of all the trees, that’s the sort of technical expertise we want to give the PNG government a number of options and that’s the data that the PNG government can use and decide how to set policies.”

 

Reference: Yafoi, Melisha. Post-Courier (2 September 2022). “K7 Million In PNG Coffee Export Orders From UK”.



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For the Goodman, et al., data go to Table 3.6 on p.61 in their report.\ Disclosure: This research was undertaken with the support of the ANU-UPNG Partnership, an initiative of the PNG-Australia Partnership, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The views are those of the authors only. This article appeared first on Devpolicy Blog (devpolicy.org), from the Development Policy Centre at The Australian National University. Stephen Howes is Director of the Development Policy Centre and Professor of Economics at the Crawford School of Public Policy, at The Australian National University. Kingtau Mambon is currently undertaking a Master of International and Development Economics at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, for which he was awarded a scholarship through the ANU-UPNG Partnership. Kelly Samof is a lecturer in economics at the School of Business and Public Policy, University of Papua New Guinea.

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