UK promoting PNG coffee

by PNG Business News - April 04, 2022

According to the British High Commission in PNG, Papua New Guinea's specialty coffee has consistently received top cupping scores for its unique and distinctive single-origin Arabica coffee.

The coffee was pushed by the UK's trade partnerships programme (UKTP), which was provided through the International Trade Centre, Banz Kofi, and the PNG Coffee Industry Corporation, according to the commission.

The speciality coffee was presented in the center, which was chosen by smallholders from PNG's lush volcanic soil.

UKTP has assisted coffee farmers and exporters in PNG in gaining market recognition for high-quality speciality coffee and connecting producers with buyers, benefiting whole communities along the agricultural value chain.

British High Commissioner to PNG Keith Scott said: “When the UK and PNG signed an economic partnership agreement in 2019, export promotion in targeted sectors was an important element.

“PNG coffee is the best in the world. Increasing access to the large UK speciality coffee market, and beyond, ensures new sales for participating companies and offers real benefits to local coffee-growing communities in PNG.

“UK support will also enable PNG speciality coffee to be showcased at the London Coffee Festival, the Food and Drink Expo in Birmingham (April 25 to 27) and the Speciality Coffee Association World of Coffee event in Warsaw, Poland, in June.

 

Reference: The National (31 March 2022). “UK promoting PNG coffee”.



Related Articles

Agriculture

PNG Business News - April 08, 2021

Chamber: Businesses are Hoping for Recovery in the Coffee Industry

According to the Goroka Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI), business is sluggish in Goroka, Eastern Highlands, but there is hope that the situation will change when the coffee industry picks up. In a market update, GCCI president Chris Anders said that coffee has always had a significant influence on the local economy. “Business has been slow the last few weeks, the main coffee crop in the Eastern Highlands should start to come through in the next few weeks,” he said.“This will put some cash into the economy and business should pick up.” According to the Coffee Industry Corporation, the province is second only to the Western Highlands in terms of coffee production. The province's largest cash crop is coffee. Coffee remains PNG's second-biggest agricultural export earner, contributing K2.4 billion in export revenue between 2014 and 2018 and processing around 259,000 tonnes of coffee beans, according to figures from the Agriculture and Livestock Department. Meanwhile, Anders claimed that the majority of companies complied with the Covid-19 pandemic controls. “But the people are not social distancing and not all are wearing masks which is a concern,” he said. “The main market is still a concern as this is where a large number of people gather.” Goroka market is currently at Peace Park.

Agriculture

PNG Business News - April 12, 2021

Governments Struggle with Providing Facilities, Says Study

Governments in some coffee-producing countries have struggled to provide facilities that encourage the cultivation and processing of high-quality coffee. Strategies for improving coffee production and processing in Papua New Guinea: Lessons from the top five coffee-producing countries, a report by the PNG National Research Institute (NRI), highlighted the country's coffee production and processing and proposed development strategies based on lessons learned from the top five coffee-producing countries in the world. Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Indonesia, Ethiopia, and Papua New Guinea were among the six coffee-producing countries studied across four continents. The study's abstract can be found below. Introduction Coffee is the second most important agricultural crop in Papua New Guinea (PNG), after oil palm. Coffee processing produced jobs as well as foreign currency earnings. From 2012 to 2017, coffee accounted for 27% of total agricultural exports and 6% of the country's gross domestic product (GDP). It helped PNG's economy in a variety of ways, including transportation, construction, manufacturing, retail and wholesale, insurance, and banking. Arabica is a coffee species that is widely grown in PNG, mostly in the Highlands between 700 and 2,050 meters above sea level. Robusta is grown in coastal areas of PNG at elevations of up to 550 meters above sea level. PNG produces high-quality, fine-flavour Arabica coffee, which is highly sought after by coffee drinkers. Coffee production in PNG, on the other hand, seems to be decreasing. Between 1998 and 2018, according to a survey by AECOM (2018) on PNG coffee market research, exports fell to 934 60kg bags. In the foreign market, the price of coffee has also been falling over time. The implication is that, since the two components of coffee revenue (output and price) to producers are decreasing, the revenue would decline over time, resulting in significant consequences for the producers and the PNG economy. Results of study In Papua New Guinea, the annual area of coffee fields cultivated ranges from 41,000 hectares in 2002 to 87,000 hectares in 1999. In PNG, the area of coffee fields cultivated decreased by 33% from 81,000 hectares in 1998 to 54,000 hectares in 2018. When compared to the smallest area of coffee field harvest among the top five nations, PNG's largest harvested area (87,000 hectares) is 71% less than the smallest harvested area (220,000 hectares). The amount of coffee beans processed has decreased by 28% from 81,000 tonnes in 1998 to 58,000 tonnes in 2018. It's worth noting that there was no data available for 2008. Over the course of the research, PNG's annual coffee production was lower than that of the top five coffee-producing countries. Vietnam had the most coffee harvested per hectare of the top five coffee-producing countries. It jumped from 1,875 kg/ha in 1998 to 2,612 kg/ha in 2018, a 39 percent rise. Brazil harvested 816 kilograms per hectare in 1998 and 1,906 kilograms per hectare in 2018, a 134 per cent rise. Findings from a literature review on key challenges to coffee production and processing in Papua New Guinea The following are some of the obstacles to coffee production and processing in PNG: INADEQUATE access to basic infrastructure and facilities – Smallholder farmers, especially those in rural areas, struggle to find facilities for coffee milling and storage. There were no decent roads for transporting agricultural supplies and goods to and from their coffee fields. FARM management activities – Most coffee trees have reached the end of their economic sustainable life cycle, resulting in a decrease in crop yield. Producers postpone or fail to perform required coffee husbandry activities such as daily pruning and the planting of shade trees. REDUCED YIELD AND Uneven PRODUCT QUALITY – The quality of coffee produced in PNG is deteriorating. INADEQUATE extension services – Coffee farmers, especially smallholders, need education on modern coffee production methods. They, on the other hand, often find it impossible to obtain services from extension agents. TECHNOLOGY – Modern technology can help coffee farmers increase productivity and increase the appeal of their commodity. Coffee farmers in PNG, on the other hand, often lack modern technologies, which limits their ability to reach their full potential in the coffee industry. CHANGE IN CROPPING Trend – Due to a drop in coffee market prices or problems with access to coffee processing facilities, some coffee farmers turn all or part of their coffee fields to other more cost-effective crops. The turn to other crops may also be due to labour shortages for essential farm tasks including pruning coffee trees and picking coffee beans. PESTS and diseases – Other threats threatening coffee production include the coffee berry borer, coffee leaf rust, coffee green scale, and pink disease (DAL, 2020). UNFAVORABLE MARKET PRICES – The price paid to smallholder coffee farmers is often less than the rate paid to exporters. Smallholders are also discouraged from paying attention to required farm activities, which has an effect on coffee productivity. FINANCIAL ACCESS – Certain coffee farmers choose to grow their farm or buy coffee processing equipment. They, on the other hand, frequently have difficulty obtaining loans from commercial banks. ACCESS TO LAND FOR COMMERCIAL COFFEE PRODUCTION – A wide area of land is required for commercial coffee production to be productive, particularly in terms of economies of scale. Broad tracts of land with proper names, on the other hand, are often difficult to navigate. This is due to the fact that the state-owned property with proper titles is almost depleted. Communal-owned property, which accounts for nearly 97 per cent of total land in PNG, lacks proper titles; and SECURITY issues – Theft of coffee goods, particularly in rural areas, is a major concern for farmers and raises production costs and losses. Discussion The results of this study revealed that PNG has the potential to become one of the world's leading coffee producers. The country's climatic and environmental conditions are ideal for growing a variety of coffee varieties, giving it an advantage over some of the world's top coffee producers. This may explain why, according to the study, PNG had a higher average coffee yield per hectare than all of the top five coffee-producing countries except Vietnam. However, the region of cultivated coffee fields and the quantity of coffee produced by PNG have remained lower than those of the other top five coffee-producing countries studied in this report. The PPAP, which is being implemented by the government with the support of the World Bank, has the ability to increase PNG's coffee production and make the country more competitive in the coffee industry. However, the PPAP benefits only certain coffee farmers, making it impossible to achieve the desired rise in coffee demand. More robust and reliable monitoring and evaluation processes are needed for the PPAP to contribute more meaningfully to the coffee market. The project should place a greater emphasis on coffee tree replanting and plantation regeneration. To increase overall coffee production in PNG, all coffee growers should have access to the PPAP (for example, through an all inclusion program).

Agriculture

PNG Business News - March 29, 2021

Coffee Demand Has Declined, According to a Survey

According to estimates from a survey, coffee production in the country has been decreasing for the past ten years. “From 1998 to 2018, the coffee harvest area and quantity of coffee produced in PNG decreased by 33 per cent and 28 per cent respectively,” a National Research Institute (NRI) report stated. The downturn was triggered by the problems that coffee growers face, such as a shortage of processing facilities, insufficient extension resources, and restricted access to finance. The problems could be resolved by the strategies suggested by NRI deputy director for research Prof Euegene Ezebilo and Prof Carolyn Afolami of the Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, based on the fact that “PNG has ideal environmental and climatic conditions for growing high-quality coffee.” They concluded in their paper, Strategies for improving coffee production and processing in PNG: Lessons from the top five coffee-producing countries, that the government's "political will" was critical in moving the coffee industry forward. “And this can be done by promoting effective extension services and training coffee growers on modern systems and innovations in producing coffee; provide funds for research and farm management practices; and, support farmers through loans facility at low-interest rates,” NRI said in a statement. “Policymakers, planners and agricultural managers are urged to take heed of the findings to make informed decisions on boosting the yield and quality of this commodity.”


Recent Articles

Company

PNG Business News - May 16, 2022

Get over it... with PNG Forest Products' NiuBridge

Photo: NiuBridge on the Boluminski Hwy, New Ireland, PNG You know how they say, “Build a bridge… and get over it”?  Well with PNGFP NiuBridge you don’t have to build it, because it’s already built! These expertly designed and engineered modular bridges are prefabricated to your specifications by PNG Forest Products. With a design life of 50+ years and installed cost base typically under half that of equivalent concrete or steel, NiuBridge is the ideal, most cost-effective solution for bridging installations in Papua New Guinea.  The NiuBridge System includes deck, girders, kerbing and accessories, and comes with a pre-applied bitumen surface. Little maintenance is required thanks to PNGFP’s unique veneer preservation treatment, ensuring complete protection from termites and rotting. NiuBridge is manufactured from PNG plantation pine to both AS/NZS 2269 and AS/NZS 1604 standards and exploits the advantages of natural timber, which is not subject to fatigue failure, unlike other materials such as steel and concrete. Available in single lane, dual lane, or custom design, NiuBridge is suitable for a range of load conditions including Austroads T44 and AS 500 Bridge Design.  NiuBridge and sister product NiuDeck are widely used by local and state governments across Australia. The peak body for the timber industry in Queensland has welcomed these products as a demonstration of the versatility and innovation of using Engineered Wood Products in bridge construction. “Using prefabricated timber systems in bridges is gaining greater market recognition due to their inherent strength, light weight and low carbon emissions footprint compared to other construction materials”, said the CEO of Timber Queensland, Mick Stephens. So next time you need to get over it, don’t waste valuable time and loads of money building a bridge. Buy a NiuBridge and get over it sooner and more cost effectively!

Company

PNG Business News - May 16, 2022

Need help with to live, work and study in Australia and with student enrolments in EQI accredited schools? Ask Migration Plus!

Photo credit: Migration Plus Migration Plus is a leading Migration firm in Cairns, in the Far North Queensland region providing professional migration advice to students, individuals, government, businesses and corporate groups including the mining, hospitality, tourism, agricultural and air services industries. Migration Plus are also Education Agents with Qualified Education Counsellors on their team and they represent a number of reputable universities and colleges across Australia, including Education Queensland International (EQI) for student enrolments.  They work closely with EQI and have successfully assisted PNG students enrol in schools across Queensland and also assisted with visa applications for the students for many years.   With Australian borders opening to international visitors, temporary workers and international students, they can assist you with all migration matters for your business and family to visit, work or study in Australia.  Now is the time to start your children’s enrolment to study in any of the EQI’s accredited schools from Prep to Year 12.  Education Counsellors at Migration Plus can assist your children’s enrolment for Year 10, Semester 2, the important pathway into senior high school subjects through the Senior Education and Training Plan. Semester 2 commences in July 2022. With an in-depth knowledge of migration law, their specialist team provides a complete solution to your migration requirements and coordinate all facets of your migration needs. The Migration Plus team is very passionate about what they we do – the rewards of being able to assist in changing lives and helping clients achieve their goals is first and foremost.  With over 90 years of combined experience available to you, you can count on their highly specialised team for accurate advice. Contact the Specialist team for further information.

Business

Marcelle P. Villegas - May 16, 2022

Australia Opens Its Doors to International Students

Photo credit: Education Queensland International “International students are an important part of the Australian community, and we are excited to welcome them back to our classrooms, campuses and communities.”  This was the announcement posted on their website by the Australian Government last February to herald the reopening of international travel to students. “Australia’s borders are open to fully vaccinated international students and Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) visa holders.” [1] “From 21 February 2022, all visa holders who are fully vaccinated for international travel purposes can travel to Australia without a travel exemption. Unvaccinated visa holders will still need to be in an exempt category or hold an individual travel exemption to enter Australia.” [2] The Australian Government said that international students will be subject to Australian Government border restrictions and any State and Territory quarantine and testing requirements. Quarantine and testing arrangements for State and Territories are frequently changing. Therefore, international students are advised to visit www.Australia.gov.au/states to be updated with the latest information and announcements of the Australian Government. In relation to this, the Department of Education, Skills and Employment has developed a “factsheet on the reopening of international travel to students” which is available for downloading from the website. [3] “All visa holders who are fully vaccinated in accordance with Australia’s international border entry requirements are able to arrive in Australia without needing an approved travel exemption. This includes fully vaccinated international students.” [1] Here are more important reminders from the Australian Government: People who do not meet Australia’s vaccination requirements for international travel must apply for a travel exemption to travel to Australia, unless they are in an exempt category. Visa holders who arrive in Australia may have their visa cancelled and be detained and removed if they: are not fully vaccinated for international travel purposes in accordance with Australia’s border entry requirements; or do not have a medical contraindication to a COVID-19 vaccine as defined by the Australian Government; or are not in an exempt category or hold an individual travel exemption. To be considered as “fully vaccinated for international travel purpose” to or from Australia, one should have completed a primary course of a vaccine approved or recognized by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). This includes mixed doses. The currently approved or recognised vaccines for travel are the following: Two doses at least 14 days apart of AstraZeneca Vaxzevria, AstraZeneca Covishield, Pfizer/Biontech Comirnaty, Moderna Spikevax or Takeda, Sinovac Coronavac, Bharat Biotech Covaxin, Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV (for people under 60 years of age on arrival in Australia), Gamaleya Research Institute Sputnik V, Novavax/Biocelect Nuvaxovid. Single-dose dose of Johnson & Johnson/ Janssen-Cilag COVID Vaccine are also in the list of approved and recognized vaccines. “At least 7 days must have passed since the final dose of vaccine in a course of immunisation for you to be considered fully vaccinated for international travel purposes. Mixed doses count towards being fully vaccinated as long as all vaccines are approved or recognised by the TGA.” How about exceptions for vaccination requirements and arrangement for children? “People with acceptable proof they cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, and children under 12, can access the same travel arrangement as people who are fully vaccinated for international travel purposes.” Moreover, temporary visa holders who are younger than 18 years old at the time of departure for international travel to Australia do not require an approved travel exemption when the child is travelling with at least one adult who is fully vaccinated for international travel purposes. “Unvaccinated or partially vaccinated children aged 12-17 years old entering Australia may be exempt from passenger caps and eligible for reduced quarantine requirements. Travellers should always check the quarantine requirements for the state or territory they plan to travel to, or transit through, prior to arranging their travel.” “If the child is travelling with unvaccinated adult family members, then the entire family group will be subject to managed quarantine and passenger caps.” For more information on vaccination travel requirements, quarantine rules, and other related matter, visit https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/vaccinated-travellers.   Reference: [1] https://www.dese.gov.au/reopening-international-travel-students [2] https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/vaccinated-travellers [3] Factsheet on the reopening of international travel to students https://www.dese.gov.au/reopening-international-travel-students/resources/factsheet-reopening-international-travel-students

Join Papua New Guinea's

Business Community

Be the "First" to get our exclusive Digital Magazine & Weekly Newsletter.