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Cause of Low Coffee Output Identified

by PNG Business News - June 28, 2021

Photo Credit: RoastyCoffee.com

Inadequate extension services have been identified as a cause of low coffee output in the country, according to a study.

Prof Eugene Ezebilo, the National Research Institute's deputy director for research, authored a paper titled Strategic initiatives to boost the competitiveness of coffee production in Papua New Guinea” It gives you some ideas for how to improve the production of coffee in PNG.

Inadequate facilities for processing coffee are also mentioned as a significant issue.

The conclusions have been pressed upon agricultural managers, planners, and policymakers.

“Coffee is one of the most important agricultural commodities for the government and farmers,” Prof Ezebilo states.

“Though PNG has a suitable environment and climatic conditions for growing high-quality coffee, there are challenges that need to be addressed.

“The findings will assist agriculture managers, planners and policymakers in making decisions on how to improve coffee production in an effective and efficient manner.”

Inadequate facilities for processing coffee, insufficient extension services, and limited access to funding were among the problems.

Coffee output in PNG may be enhanced, according to the research, by encouraging efficient extension services for coffee producers and removing coffee plants that had outlived their economic usefulness.

Providing low-interest loans to farmers who wish to grow output and promoting contemporary production and processing techniques were also suggested as ways to boost productivity.

 

References:

The National (21 June 2021). “Lack of extensive services behind drop in coffee production: Study”.

The National Research Institute. “Research findings important to improving coffee industry”.



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